Colds and flu

Updated 24 June 2013

New death in Saudi from Sars-like coronavirus

Another person in Saudi Arabia died of the SARS-like coronavirus MERS, and six new cases were registered, as international experts in Cairo discussed the epidemic.


Saudi Arabia said another person had died of the Sars-like coronavirus MERS, and six new cases were registered, in statements on Thursday and Friday as international experts gather in Cairo to discuss the epidemic.

Experts, including from the World Health Organisation, are nearing the end of a four-day meeting on the disease which has now infected 55 people, killing 33 of them, in Saudi Arabia.

Added to previous WHO numbers, the new Saudi announcement brings the total number of confirmed cases to 70 worldwide, of which 39 have died.

In July large numbers of pilgrims are expected to travel to the Saudi city of Mecca, the birthplace of Islam, during the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan. In October millions are expected there for the annual haj pilgrimage.

More deadly than Sars

Late on Friday the Saudi Health Ministry said a 41-year-old woman in Riyadh was in a stable condition with the disease, and that a 32-year-old with cancer was also being treated. It said another person, whose infection was previously announced, had died.

On Thursday, it confirmed four new cases, including three health workers, who have all recovered.

Researchers said Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, is even more deadly than Sars and is easily transmitted in healthcare environments.

The disease can cause coughing, fever and pneumonia and has spread from the Gulf to France, Germany, Italy and Britain.


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Flu expert

Dr Heidi van Deventer completed her MBChB (Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery) degree in 2004 at the University of Stellenbosch.
She has additional training in ACLS (Advanced Cardiac Life Support) and PALS (Paediatric Advanced Life Support) as well as biostatistics and epidemiology.

Dr Van Deventer is currently working as a researcher at the Desmond Tutu Tuberculosis Centre at the University of Stellenbosch.

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