Eye Health

08 January 2010

Cleopatra's make-up cured eye disease

Ancient Egypt's stunning eye make-up not only shielded wearers from the dark deeds of the evil eye but also protected them against eye disease, French scientists said.

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Ancient Egypt's stunning eye make-up not only shielded wearers from the dark deeds of the evil eye, but also protected them against eye disease, French scientists said.

Ancient Egyptians some 4 000 years ago produced the make-up used to darken and adorn eyes with lead and lead salts in mixtures that sometimes took a month to concoct, said Philippe Walter, who co-headed a team of scientists from the Louvre museum and the CNRS national research institute.

"We knew ancient Greeks and Romans too had noted the make-up had medicinal properties, but wanted to determine exactly how," he told AFP.

Contrary to widely held belief that lead is harmful, the team, using analytical chemistry, determined that "in very low doses lead does not kill cells."

Instead, it produces a molecule -- nitric oxide -- that activates the immune defence system which beats back bacteria in case of eye infection.

The research was carried out using a tiny electrode, the 10th of the size of a hair, to look at the effect of a lead chloride synthesised by the Egyptians -- laurionite -- on a single cell. The study was released by the journal Analytical Chemistry.

However, Health24's EviroHealth editor, Olivia Rose-Innes points out,  "This research is referring to very low lead levels. Higher levels of lead exposure are extremely toxic. Lead poisoning was one of the earliest recognised environmental hazards, and cases have been recorded since ancient times – most notably, Ancient Rome, where lead was used in the water pipes and drinking vessels, and sometimes added to beverages. Some historians have even suggested that lead poisoning was one of the contributory causes to the downfall of the Roman Empire.

- (Sapa, January 2010)

 

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Megan Goodman qualified as an optometrist from the University of Johannesburg and is currently practising at Tygerberg Academic Hospital in Cape Town. She has recently completed a Masters degree in Clinical Epidemiology at Stellenbosch University. She has a keen interest in ocular pathology and evidence based medicine as well as contact lenses.

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