Eye Health

Updated 15 February 2016

Lady Gaga eye lens fad is dangerous

Cosmetic contact lenses that give wearers an exaggerated "doe-eyed" look are "an emerging and potentially dangerous trend among teenagers and young adults," the American Academy of Ophthalmology warned.

0

Cosmetic contact lenses that give wearers an exaggerated "doe-eyed" look are "an emerging and potentially dangerous trend among teenagers and young adults," the American Academy of Ophthalmology warned in a statement. (Image: AFP)

The "circle" lens extends beyond the iris and, in doing so, makes the eye appear larger. Their use among the young increased recently after pop star Lady Gaga displayed the look in her "Bad Romance" music video, The New York Times reported.

"I've noticed a lot of girls in my town have started to wear them a lot," 16-year-old Melody Vue, from Morganton, N.C., told the Times. Vue said she owns 22 pairs and wears them regularly.

According to the AAO, over-the-counter sales of nonprescription cosmetic lenses has been banned by law in the United States since 2005, but they are available online. All contact lenses are classified as medical devices and can only be distributed through licensed eye care professionals.

Consumers warned of hazards

In its statement, the AAO said it "would like to alert consumers to the hazards of buying any decorative lenses, including circle lenses, without a prescription. Any type of contact lens is a medical device that requires a prescription, proper fitting by an eye care professional and a commitment to proper care by the consumer."

The eye doctors' group also noted that "inflammation and pain can occur from improperly fitted, over-the-counter lenses and lead to more serious problems including corneal abrasions and blinding infections."

The AAO urged that all contact lenses be fitted by a trained professional, and that anyone who develops "pain, burning, redness, tearing or sensitivity to light while wearing any type of contact lenses," should consult an ophthalmologist. - (HealthDay News, July 2010)

 

Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
0 comments
Comments have been closed for this article.

Ask the Expert

Optometrist

Megan Goodman qualified as an optometrist from the University of Johannesburg and is currently practising at Tygerberg Academic Hospital in Cape Town. She has recently completed a Masters degree in Clinical Epidemiology at Stellenbosch University. She has a keen interest in ocular pathology and evidence based medicine as well as contact lenses.

Still have a question?

Get free advice from our panel of experts

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

* You must accept our condition

Forum Rules