Diabetes

22 October 2012

Exercise delays ageing in diabetics

Regular exercise may slow the premature ageing of the cardiovascular system that occurs in people with type 2 diabetes, according to new research.

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Regular exercise may slow the premature ageing of the cardiovascular system that occurs in people with type 2 diabetes, according to new research.

A healthy adult loses about 10% of fitness with each decade of life after age 40 or 50, but research shows that fitness levels in people with type 2 diabetes are about 20% lower than in healthy adults.

This accelerated loss of fitness increases the risk of early disability and death, said Amy Huebschmann, of the University of Colorado School of Medicine, and colleagues.

"Not only do these patients have more trouble with exercise ... but also with activities of daily living, such as a simple stroll to the corner store," the researchers said.

What the study found

The investigators confirmed other research, however, that has found that regular exercise can slow premature cardiovascular aging in diabetes patients. The findings suggest that their fitness levels can improve by as much as 40% after 12 to 20 weeks of exercise training.

"In other words, these defects are not necessarily permanent," Huebschmann said. "They can be improved, which is great news."

Regular exercise, however, does not restore diabetes patients' fitness levels to those of healthy adults, according to the findings. The research was presented last week at an exercise conference in Colorado sponsored by the American Physiological Society, the American College of Sports Medicine and the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology. Data and conclusions presented at medical meetings should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal

Although exercise can benefit diabetes patients, it may be difficult for them to achieve the recommended 150 minutes per week of moderate exercise. Huebschmann and her colleagues are working on ways to help diabetes patients reach their exercise goals.

"Type 2 diabetes has a significant negative impact on health, but that impact can be improved with as simple an intervention as regular brisk walking or other physical activity that most people with diabetes can do," Huebschmann said.

Read more:
Sweet life

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention explains how to stay healthy with diabetes.


(Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.)

 

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Dr. May currently works as a fulltime endocrinologist and has been in private practice since 2004. He has a variety of interests, predominantly obesity and diabetes, but also sees patients with osteoporosis, thyroid disorders, men's health disorders, pituitary and adrenal disorders, polycystic ovaries, and disorders of growth. He is a leading member of several obesity and diabetes societies and runs a trial centre for new drugs.

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