Diabetes

26 March 2012

Diabetes linked with risk of cardiovascular problems in men

According to researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital, men with type 2 diabetes treated with insulin without a history of CVD were at higher risk for cardiovascular events.

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According to a new study by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), men with type 2 diabetes treated with insulin without a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) were at higher risk for major cardiovascular events (e.g., death, heart attack, stroke) compared with men who had a history of CVD.

Using data from the global REACH Registry, researchers evaluated the magnitude of risk of diabetes mellitus on cardiovascular events in both men and women. Risk was estimated in men and women separately independent of patient age, ethnicity, and other cardiovascular risk factors.

Type 2 diabetic men high risk

Among the 64,000 eligible REACH patients, the four-year risk of major cardiovascular events (death, heart attack or stroke) increased incrementally in patients with diabetes treated with diet only, oral diabetes medications or insulin.

Male patients with type 2 diabetes treated with insulin but without prior CVD were a particular high-risk group, with an accelerated rate of new cardiovascular events compared to their female counterparts.

For instance, men with diabetes taking insulin had a 16% rate of major cardiovascular events over four years. Whereas, men with prior CVD without diabetes had a lower rate for these cardiovascular events, similar to women with diabetes taking insulin and women without diabetes but with prior CVD (about 13%).

The researchers concluded that men with diabetes taking insulin had a 70% increased risk for a first cardiovascular event compared to men with a known history of CVD having a recurrent event.

No gender risk differences

In addition, men with diabetes taking insulin were at a 40% higher risk than women.

Lower-risk patients (those with diabetes not taking insulin) and very high-risk patients (those with both diabetes and CVD) had no apparent gender-risk differences.

"These findings suggest that both men and women with diabetes with severe insulin resistance (those patients requiring insulin) are at high risk for cardiovascular events, as high risk as patients who already have established cardiovascular disease," said Jacob Udell, MD, Cardiovascular Division, BWH Department of Medicine, and lead study investigator. "Given that the number of patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes requiring insulin continues to increase, these patients require diligent cardiovascular risk factor management to potentially avoid a first cardiovascular event."

(Eurek Alert, March 2012) 

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