Diabetes

19 September 2012

Bariatric surgery substantially reduces the risk of diabetes

Bariatric surgery reduces the long-term risk of developing diabetes by over 80 % among people with obesity.

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Bariatric surgery reduces the long-term risk of developing diabetes by over 80% among people with obesity. The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) has published the results of a study conducted at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

A study conducted by Professor Lars Sjöström, Professor Lena Carlsson and their team at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, has found that bariatric surgery is considerably more effective than traditional care and lifestyle changes in preventing diabetes among people with obesity.

How the study was done

The treatment group consisted of 1 658 subjects who had undergone bariatric surgery, while the control group consisted of 1 771 equally obese people who had received traditional care. During 15-year follow-up, 392 people in the control group and only 110 people in the treatment group developed diabetes.

"Our results show that bariatric surgery can reduce the risk of developing diabetes by more than 80 %", Professor Sjöström says. "This is an extremely high figure."

The study is based on an extensive study entitled Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS), which has given rise to more than 90 scientific articles and demonstrated that bariatric surgery is also highly beneficial when it comes to cancer, cardiovascular disease, total mortality and health-related quality of life.

"Both women and men benefited in terms of diabetes", Professor Sjöström says, "but the degree of obesity at baseline did not affect the results."

 (EurekAlert, September 2012)

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Dr. May currently works as a fulltime endocrinologist and has been in private practice since 2004. He has a variety of interests, predominantly obesity and diabetes, but also sees patients with osteoporosis, thyroid disorders, men's health disorders, pituitary and adrenal disorders, polycystic ovaries, and disorders of growth. He is a leading member of several obesity and diabetes societies and runs a trial centre for new drugs.

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