Diabetes

06 July 2011

Aspirin cuts heart attack risk in diabetics

In some cases, an apple a day may keep the doctor away, but for people with diabetes, regular, over-the-counter Aspirin may also do the job.

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In some cases, an apple a day may keep the doctor away, but for people with diabetes, regular, over-the-counter Aspirin may also do the job.

A new study by University of Alberta (Canada) researcher Scot Simpson has shed light on the use of Aspirin as a preventative measure for cardiovascular disease and reoccurrence in patients with diabetes.

The study collected data from clinical trials that looked at whether taking Aspirin as a course of treatment would prevent a first or recurrent heart attack or stroke.

Using information from diabetic patients in these studies, Simpson discovered that patients with previous cardiac episodes who were taking a low dose of Aspirin daily had very little benefit in terms of prevention of a second heart attack or a decreased risk of mortality. However, in patients taking higher doses of Aspirin, the risk of a repeat heart attack and/or death was significantly lower.

"We took all of the data from 21 studies and focused specifically on diabetic patients who had suffered a previous heart attack or stroke to measure the ability of Aspirin to prevent a second event. We found that, if those patients took up to 325mg of Aspirin per day, they had a 23% lower risk of death," said Simpson.

Diabetes ups heart disease risk

Simpson, an associate professor in the Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, says that people with diabetes are at an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, adding that there is evidence that suggests as much as 60% of deaths in diabetics are attributable to heart disease. Simpson says he always suspected the Aspirin dosage could play a role in treating cardiovascular disease in diabetics and felt that because Aspirin was an over-the-counter medication, it was something that pharmacists could have an active role in administering.

"The pharmacists' best role for chronic disease management is working proactively with physicians and patients," said Simpson. "Whether that means working directly with the physician, and consulting about prescribed medications, or when the patient is deciding about whether or not to take Aspirin as part of a treatment plan, pharmacists can have a significant, positive impact." - (EurekAlert, July 2011)

Read more:
Aspirin and heart disease
Aspirin may cut colon cancer risk

 

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Dr. May currently works as a fulltime endocrinologist and has been in private practice since 2004. He has a variety of interests, predominantly obesity and diabetes, but also sees patients with osteoporosis, thyroid disorders, men's health disorders, pituitary and adrenal disorders, polycystic ovaries, and disorders of growth. He is a leading member of several obesity and diabetes societies and runs a trial centre for new drugs.

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