Diabetes

05 February 2014

Blood sugar monitoring device approved for kids

FDA approval of the Dexcom G4 Platinum Continuous Monitoring System has been expanded to include children with diabetes aged 2 years to 17 years.

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US Food and Drug Administration approval of the Dexcom G4 Platinum Continuous Monitoring System has been expanded to include children with diabetes aged 2 years to 17 years, the agency said.

Previously approved for adults only, the device constantly monitors the user's blood sugar, checking for dangerously high or low levels, the FDA said in a news release. An estimated 25.8 million people in the United States including 215 000 under age 20 have diabetes.

The external device, known as a continuous glucose monitor, includes a small, narrow sensor that's inserted just under the skin. That combined with a blood glucose meter can help the user's doctor decide treatment options, such as the amount of insulin to prescribe, the FDA said.

Read: Diabetes: blood pressure monitored by cell phone

The device was evaluated in clinical studies involving 176 people ages 2 to 17. The FDA warned the device's "performance in paediatric subjects was not as accurate as the performance of the same device in adults." Nonetheless, the agency said the device is still "effective for tracking and trending to determine patterns in glucose levels", and for warning users that their blood sugar had risen too high or fallen too low.

The system is produced by Dexacom Inc., based in San Diego.

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Dr. May currently works as a fulltime endocrinologist and has been in private practice since 2004. He has a variety of interests, predominantly obesity and diabetes, but also sees patients with osteoporosis, thyroid disorders, men's health disorders, pituitary and adrenal disorders, polycystic ovaries, and disorders of growth. He is a leading member of several obesity and diabetes societies and runs a trial centre for new drugs.

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