Depression

24 December 2016

7 signs of depression over the festive season

The festive season can be a tough time of year for people who suffer from depression.

0

The symptoms of depression, according to the Mayo Clinic, include feelings of sadness and irritation, exhaustion, feelings of worthlessness, difficulties with concentration, sleep disturbances and unexplained aches or pains.

Read: How to avoid stress and depression over Christmas

Here’s how these symptoms might manifest at this time of year:

1. Gloom amongst the cheer. The Christmas decorations and jingles make you feel sad, tearful and empty, not joyful.

2. Festive season irritation. You used to enjoy Christmas shopping and planning special meals, now the crowds just irritate and frustrate you, and you have no interest in your usual special occasion recipes.

3. Always tired. You feel permanently exhausted and restless, and the thought of the family crowd just makes you anxious. Your sleeping patterns are also disturbed.

4. Avoiding people. At this time of the year there is increased social activity with family and/or friends, not necessarily something you feel like doing at all when you are depressed. You want to be on your own, but then you also feel lonely.

5. End-of-year reflections. You feel worthless, and keep thinking about the failures of the past year, and forget about the good things that happened.

6. No focus. You have difficulty remembering things, such as the people you still need to buy gifts for, and you can’t seem to concentrate on anything.

7. Aches and pains. You’re experiencing physical problems, such as back pain and headaches -- and someone else is decorating the tree this year.

Read more:

Pets a great help to people with depression

When should you see a psychologist?

Can you prevent depression?

 

Ask the Expert

Depression expert

Michael Simpson has been a senior psychiatric academic, researcher, and Professor in several countries, having worked at London University in the UK; McMaster University in Canada; Temple University in Philadelphia, USA.; and the University of Natal in South Africa.

Still have a question?

Get free advice from our panel of experts

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

* You must accept our condition

Forum Rules