Cervical Cancer

Updated 19 November 2014

Cervical cancer vaccination for SA schoolgirls

South Africa has launched a campaign to vaccinate all Grade Four schoolgirls in public schools against cervical cancer, targeting close to 500 000 girls.


A national vaccination campaign to prevent cervical cancer in women was launched today, targeting thousands of Grade Four schoolgirls.

Read more: What are the causes of cervical cancer?

"South Africa is today one of the very few countries in the continent to provide this vaccine to all Grade Four girls in public schools," said Health Minister Aaron Motsoaledi at the Gonyane Primary School in Bloemfontein.

"Certainly we are the first in the continent to target so many girls, close to 500 000."

Read: What you need to know about HP vaccination in SA

Worse in developing countries

Motsoaledi said it was mostly women in developing countries who bore the heaviest burden and suffered the most from the disease.

The severity, complications, human suffering, and loss of life from the disease were worse in developing countries.

This was due to poorly resourced infrastructure, limited access to early screening, treatment, and the management of complications.

Referring to the group of nine-year-old girls to be vaccinated, Motsoaledi said it was to protect them from cervical cancer in 20 years' time.

"I want to say that I am so proud of you for being so strong and brave. We thank you and your parents for allowing us to vaccinate you today.”

Motsoaledi said the vaccinations were an investment not only in the girls' health, but in the health of a future generation of women.

Read more:

Cervical cancer vaccinations in SA
Lowdown on cervical cancer vaccines
Cervical vaccine for anal cancer



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