30 April 2010

Cancer Risk After Kidney Transplant Unaffected by Type of Drug Treatment

Risk similar from all drugs used to prevent organ rejection, researchers find


This article has not necessarily been edited by Health24.

THURSDAY, April 29 (HealthDay News) -- The type of drug treatment used to prevent organ rejection in kidney transplant patients doesn't affect cancer risk, a new study finds.

Kidney transplant patients are at increased risk for cancer, likely because of patients' long-term use of immunosuppressive drugs to prevent organ rejection. In this study, Australian researchers examined the incidence of cancer in 481 kidney transplant patients.

The patients had received one of three treatment regimens: azathioprine and prednisolone; cyclosporine monotherapy; or cyclesoporine monotherapy followed by a switch to azathioprine and prednisolone after three months.

In the 20 years after transplant, 226 patients developed at least one cancer, including 48 percent who developed skin cancer and 27 percent who developed non-skin cancer. None of the anti-rejection treatments had a greater effect than another on cancer timing or incidence.

The findings indicate that "any differences in cancer risk from these different treatments are unlikely to be clinically significant," said study author Martin Gallagher, of the George Institute for International Health in Australia.

He and his colleagues also found that kidney transplant recipients' increased risk of cancer is significantly influenced by certain characteristics at the time of transplant. For example, non-skin cancer is associated with increasing age and previous smoking history, while skin cancer is associated with increasing age, non-brown eye color, fairer skin, and a functioning transplant.

High-risk patients need to be monitored more closely and use preventive measures to protect against cancer, the researchers said.

The study appears in the April 29 issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

More information

The National Kidney Foundation has more about reducing cancer risk after a kidney transplant.


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