04 February 2011

Family meals better for asthmatic kids

The amount of time families spend eating meals together has been linked to the health and well-being of children,teens and especially those who suffer from asthma.


The amount of time families spend eating meals together has been linked to the health and well-being of children and teens. With families who eat together, there are declines in substance abuse, eating disorders, and unhealthy weight in their children.

Now, a new study that looks at children with asthma has found that the quality of family interactions during mealtime affected the children's health.

The study appears in an issue of the journal, Child Development. It was conducted by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the University of Rochester Medical Centre, and Upstate Medical Centre in Syracuse, New York.

Almost 7 million American children have asthma, a chronic disease that causes airways to become sore and swollen.

The research

In this study, researchers looked at 200 families with children ages 5 to 12 who had persistent asthma, observing how they interacted during a video-recorded meal in their homes.

Whereas children with asthma generally take medicine before exercise or in a particular season, children with persistent asthma take medicine more frequently, need to avoid different allergens, and are generally advised to maintain regular routines to control the disease.

Although mealtimes lasted on average only 18 minutes, the study found that the quality of social interactions as families ate was directly related to the children's health, including how their lungs worked, their asthma symptoms, and the quality of their lives.

Simply put, in families that spent mealtimes talking about the day's events, showing genuine concern about their children's activities, and turning off electronic devices, children had better health.

Disorganised mealtimes

Families in which the primary caregiver had less education, minority families, and single-parent families experienced more disruptions during mealtime, including watching TV and talking on cell phones, and spent less time talking about the day's events.

This led to a more disorganised mealtime, which, in turn, was related to poorer health for the children in these families.

"Mealtimes represent a regular event for the vast majority of families with young, school-age, and adolescent children," notes Barbara H. Fiese, professor of human and community development, and director of the Family Resiliency Centre, at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, who led the observational study.

"They provide an optimal setting for public health initiatives and prevention efforts, and can be considered by policymakers and practitioners as a straightforward and accessible way to improve the health and wellbeing of children with asthma."

(EurekAlert, February 2011)

Read more:

Child health

Teen zone

Chronic cough

Family dinners may hinder anorexia


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Professor Keertan Dheda has received of several prestigious awards including the 2014 Oppenheimer Award, and has published over 160 peer-reviewed papers and holds 3 patents related to new TB diagnostic or infection control technologies. He serves on the editorial board of the journals PLoS One, the International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Medicine, Lancet Respiratory Diseases and Nature Scientific Reports, amongst others.Read his full biography at the University of Cape Town Lung Institute

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