31 August 2011

Climate change may increase asthma

Mount Sinai School of Medicine researchers have found that climate change may lead to more asthma-related health problems in children.


Mount Sinai School of Medicine researchers have found that climate change may lead to more asthma-related health problems in children, and more emergency room (ER) visits in the next decade.

The data, published in the current issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, found that changing levels of ozone could lead to a 7.3% increase in asthma-related emergency room visits by children, ages 0-17.

Increase in asthma emergencies

The research team, led by Perry Sheffield, MD, Assistant Professor of Preventive Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, used regional and atmospheric chemistry models to reach its calculations. They linked regional climate and air quality information to New York State Department of Health records of paediatric, asthma-related emergency room visits in 14 counties that are part of the New York City metropolitan area.
Then they simulated ozone levels for June through August for five consecutive years in the 2020s, and compared them with 1990s levels. The researchers found a median increase of 7.3% in ozone-related asthma emergency department visits, with increases ranging from 5.2% to 10.2% per county.

"Our study shows that these assessment models are an effective way of evaluating the long-term impact of global climate change on a local level," said Dr Sheffield. "This study is a jumping off point to evaluate other outcomes including cost utilisation, doctors' visits, missed school days, and a general understanding of the overall burden of climate change on children with asthma."

Dr Sheffield and her team plan to continue using these models to understand the specific impacts of climate change. The authors conclude that better measures to reduce carbon pollution that contributes to global climate change, as well as pollution that forms ozone need to be implemented.

(EurekAlert, August 2011) 

Read more;

Climate to make us sick: WHO

Asthma and children


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Professor Keertan Dheda has received of several prestigious awards including the 2014 Oppenheimer Award, and has published over 160 peer-reviewed papers and holds 3 patents related to new TB diagnostic or infection control technologies. He serves on the editorial board of the journals PLoS One, the International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Medicine, Lancet Respiratory Diseases and Nature Scientific Reports, amongst others.Read his full biography at the University of Cape Town Lung Institute

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