Arthritis

Updated 18 December 2015

Teen athletes at risk for osteoarthritis

Children with abnormal development of the long bone between the pelvis and knee from playing high-intensity sports are at greater risk for osteoarthritis of the hip, according to a new study.

0

Swiss researchers explained that deformities of the top of that bone - known as the femur - leads to reduced rotation and pain during movement among young competitive athletes.

This may explain why athletes are more likely to develop osteoarthritis than more sedentary individuals, according to Dr Klaus Siebenrock, from the University of Bern in Switzerland.

The researchers examined the physical condition and range of motion of 72 hips in 37 male professional basketball players and 76 hips in 38 control participants who had not participated in high-level sports.

Osteoarthritis and sports

The study showed that men and teens that had played in an elite basketball club since the age of eight were more likely to have osteoarthritis of the hip than in those who did not take part in regular sports. The athletes, the researchers found, had femur deformities causing their thighbone to have abnormal contact with their hip socket.

As a result, they had reduced internal hip rotation and painful hip movements. The study's authors noted these differences got worse during late adolescence.

Overall, the researchers found, athletes were 10 times more likely to have impaired hip function than those who did not play high-intensity sports.

More information

The American Academy of Pediatrics provides more information on preventing teen sports injuries.


(Copyright © 2010 HealthDay. All rights reserved.)


Read more:

Diagnosing osteoarthritis

Sport and osteoarthritis

 

Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
0 comments
Comments have been closed for this article.

Ask the Expert

Arthritis expert

Professor Asgar Ali Kalla completed his MBChB (Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery) degree in 1975 at the University of Cape Town and his FRCP in 2003 in London. Professor Ali Kalla is the Isaac Albow Chair of Rheumatology at the University of Cape Town and also the Head of Division of Rheumatology at Groote Schuur Hospital. He has participated in a number of clinical trials for rheumatology and is active in community outreach. Prof Ali Kalla is an expert in Arthritis for Health24.

Still have a question?

Get free advice from our panel of experts

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

* You must accept our condition

Forum Rules