Addiction

16 March 2007

Teens high on inhalants

In 2005, about 1.1 million American adolescents (ages 12 to 17) used common household inhalants to get high, according to a new report.

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In 2005, about 1.1 million American adolescents (ages 12 to 17) used common household inhalants to get high - a dangerous and potentially deadly activity, according to a report released Thursday by the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

The inhalants used to get high include glue, aerosol air fresheners, hair sprays, nail polish, paint solvents, shoe polish, degreasers, gasoline and lighter fluids.

Almost five percent of adolescent girls used inhalants to get high in 2005, an increase from 4.1 percent in 2002, the report found. About 4.2 percent of adolescent males used inhalants in 2005, about the same percentage as in 2002.

Things to look out for
"We are urging parents to talk to their children about inhalants and take notice when suddenly their children have bad breath, face rash, and stained clothing," Dr H. Westley Clark, director of SAMHSA's Centre for Substance Abuse Treatment, said in a prepared statement.

Misuse of inhalants can cause numerous health problems - such as brain damage, organ failure, cardiac arrest, convulsions, deafness, impaired vision - and death.

The report was released at a press conference to mark the 15th US National Inhalants and Poisons Awareness Week, March 18 to 25. – (HealthDayNews)

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Inhalants

January 2007

 

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