advertisement
20 December 2012

Solo rock stars die sooner

Rock and pop stars with a successful solo career are about twice as likely to die early as those in famous bands, according to a new study.

0

Rock and pop stars with a successful solo career are about twice as likely to die early as those in famous bands, according to a new study.

The study also found that rock and pop stars who died of drug and alcohol abuse were more likely to have had a difficult or abusive childhood than those who died of other causes.

Researchers looked at nearly 1 500 North American and European rock and pop stars between 1956 and 2006 and found that about 9% of them died during that time. The average age of death was 45 for North American stars and 39 for European stars. Performers included in the study included US legend Elvis Presley and British singer Amy Winehouse.

The difference in life expectancy between rock and pop stars and the general population widenedl until 25 years after stars achieved fame. It was only then that the death rate among European stars, but not those from North America, began to be similar to that of the general population.

How solo performers die early

Successful solo performers were nearly twice as likely to die early as those in famous bands: nearly 10% vs. about 5.5% among Europeans and nearly 23% vs. about 10% among North Americans. The study was published in the journal BMJ Open.

The findings suggest that the support offered by band mates may help reduce the risk of early death, wrote Mark Bellis, a professor at the Center for Public Health at Liverpool John Moores University in England, and colleagues.

The researchers also found that the risk of early death was lower among stars who achieved fame after 1980, according to a journal news release. Whether a star was male or female did not affect death rate, but ethnic background did, with nonwhites more likely to die early.

Nearly half of the pop and rock stars who died due to drugs, alcohol or violence had experienced at least one negative factor in their childhood, compared with about one-quarter of those who died of other causes.

Eighty percent of dead stars with more than one negative childhood factor died from substance abuse or violence. Negative childhood factors included physical, sexual or emotional abuse; living with a chronically depressed, suicidal or mentally or physically ill person; living with a substance abuser; having a close relative in prison; and coming from a broken home or one where there was domestic violence.

Read more:

10 celebrities with diabetes   

Spanking makes boys more aggressive

 

(Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.) 

 
advertisement

Get a quote

advertisement

Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
0 comments
Add your comment
Comment 0 characters remaining

Live healthier

Yoga »

Exercise time? Yoga mats matter Yoga and sleep

What yoga can do for you

Yoga is a stress-buster, but it also helps with anxiety, depression, insomnia, back pain and other ills.

Allergy alert »

Allergy myths Cold or allergy? Children and allergies

Allergy facts vs. fiction

Some of the greatest allergy myths and misconceptions can actually be damaging to your health.