Addiction

23 November 2010

Child abuse sufferers abuse alcohol as adults

Women who were sexually or physically abused as children are at increased risk for drinking problems, researchers say.

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Women who were sexually or physically abused as children are at increased risk for drinking problems, researchers say.

In the study, researchers analysed data from almost 3,700 women who took part in the 2005 US National Alcohol Survey. The investigators found that women who reported that they had been sexually abused as children were more likely to also report that they drank four or more alcoholic drinks daily, that they were alcohol dependent, and that they drank in a way that could pose serious threats to their health.

The findings show "a strong association between having a history of child abuse and problems with alcohol abuse," said lead author E. Anne Lown, a scientist with the Alcohol Research Group in Emeryville.

"The take-home message is across a range of alcohol consumption patterns, child abuse is consistently associated with alcohol abuse. All of my measures found that association," she added.

Screen for abuse

The results of the study were released onlinein advance of publication in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

"We, as a society, have to take responsibility for the healing of children and adults with a history of child abuse," Lown said. "We need to screen for abuse in all settings - not just screen for but have interventions in place that will address the long-term consequences of child abuse. Without screening, the problem will not be recognised."


(Copyright © 2010 HealthDay. All rights reserved.)

 

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