ADHD

Question
Posted by: Judy | 2010/07/09

Q.

Signs of ADHD but always very Angry and Fighting

I have a little boy who is 7 years old , he has the signs of a ADHD child but he is very angry and very Violante he will get angry cos things don''t go his way and fights and hits allot with other kids every day he is always in trouble but at home he is very rarely like that and when he is i don''t take notice of it , when he has his episodes he breaks things throws things and runs away , what am i suppose to do this is very URGENT don''t know what else he is at the moment on BIOSTRATH and it is working quite well but it is the problem with the temper and anger that is bugging me to the extent that i cry when i see him having these anger fits, i have even gone to the point that maybe someone is neglecting him and i have investigated him and that i can scratch off the list but now there is no other options , PLEASE HELP

Expert's Reply

A.

ADHD Expert

Dear Judy,

First of all, it appears that you have not yet had your son assessed; although Biostrath seems to be working for your son in some aspects, it is important to eliminate the possibility of any allergies and/or disorders.

A short temper is common among children with ADHD; anger often times is the expression of frustration.

In your post, there is no mention of what triggers his anger outbursts; this may be the first port of call: keep a diary over the next two weeks (possibly ask the teacher to do the same) and determine what causes his outbursts.

Once this has been determined you can start to implement strategies to reduce these situations. For example, if there is a particular game or person that gets him angry, try limiting his exposure to these.

Implementing routine is also very important as this reduces the 'just 5 more minutes' tendency what children are watching TV or playing a game. Routine creates structure which children find comforting.

It is also possible that your son's anger stems from feeling overwhelmed by a task such as homework, or a particular subject at school.

It is essential that once you have identified the cause for his anger, you explain this to him and teach him to be aware of his own body so that he can identify when he needs to walk away from a situation. Counting to ten, telling himself to calm down, reciting a favourite rhyme - these can all be used to calm himself.

It is also crucial that he doesn't learn that hitting will get him what he wants. There must be a consistent consequence - both at home and at school - for any 'angry behaviour'. Similarly, praise and a small reward after consecutive days of 'no angry behaviour' will also benefit him. Be sure to explain in simple clear terms what you do and don't want to see, so there can be no ambiguity.

Best wishes,
Delia

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user comments

C.

Posted by: ADD/ADHD Expert | 2010/07/12

Dear Judy,

First of all, it appears that you have not yet had your son assessed; although Biostrath seems to be working for your son in some aspects, it is important to eliminate the possibility of any allergies and/or disorders.

A short temper is common among children with ADHD; anger often times is the expression of frustration.

In your post, there is no mention of what triggers his anger outbursts; this may be the first port of call: keep a diary over the next two weeks (possibly ask the teacher to do the same) and determine what causes his outbursts.

Once this has been determined you can start to implement strategies to reduce these situations. For example, if there is a particular game or person that gets him angry, try limiting his exposure to these.

Implementing routine is also very important as this reduces the 'just 5 more minutes' tendency what children are watching TV or playing a game. Routine creates structure which children find comforting.

It is also possible that your son's anger stems from feeling overwhelmed by a task such as homework, or a particular subject at school.

It is essential that once you have identified the cause for his anger, you explain this to him and teach him to be aware of his own body so that he can identify when he needs to walk away from a situation. Counting to ten, telling himself to calm down, reciting a favourite rhyme - these can all be used to calm himself.

It is also crucial that he doesn't learn that hitting will get him what he wants. There must be a consistent consequence - both at home and at school - for any 'angry behaviour'. Similarly, praise and a small reward after consecutive days of 'no angry behaviour' will also benefit him. Be sure to explain in simple clear terms what you do and don't want to see, so there can be no ambiguity.

Best wishes,
Delia

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