ADHD

Question
Posted by: mom2two | 2011/01/19

Q.

homework, private school and adhd in 9 yo girl

My 9 yo daughter has adhd and takes medicine. She is also in a private catholic school. This school gives alot of homework. My daughter gets good grades but it takes her the entire afternoon and evening to comlete her homework. Even with a reduction in homework by the teadher, she still takes a very long time. I don''''t want to lower the bar so she feels she can get away with doing less, but at the same time, am I hurting her by making her do all her homework, even when reduced. She feels proud when she gets it all done, but it''''s such a struggle to get her there. When she completes it, it''''s as if she gains a little self respect. I keep hoping she will get the homework done sooner as she dilly dallys alot, but losing her entire day to doing homework, doesn''''t seem to bother her as much as it bothers me. Should I continue to urge her to do all her work, or should I put an end to it after 4 hours or so? If I allow her to quit before finishing, am I setting up poor work habits for her future? She is smart but appears very stubborn and does not want to do anything she doesn''''t want to do. Am I handling this wrong? My daughter was classified but lost her classification because she received all A''''s and 1 B last year. They say her adhd is no longer a handicap, but they don''''t care that it takes her all afternoon and evening to do he work. I am working on getting her reclassified again, but in the meantime, am I handling the homework right?

Expert's Reply

A.

ADHD Expert

Dear mom2two,

Your concerns are all very valid and deciding between balance and work ethic is never easy.

If her homework is taking too much time purely because of concentration and not due to a lack of understanding, reducing her homework further will likely not change things as she will simply have more time at her disposal to 'dilly dally'.

As she feels a sense of accomplishment and pride on completing her homework, the possibility of not having those positive feelings can be an incentive to make a change.

Assuming she has a quiet, non-distracting, organised space in which to work in, providing a clear structure for homework time she may be able to complete it quicker. Develop a timetable which includes working for 20 minutes separated by 5 minute breaks with a slightly longer break every two or three sessions to get a snack or something to drink. Keep a timer in her room that can be set to ring when the study session and breaks are over so that she is aware of the amount of time passing. Set a reasonable time limit for the days homework and once it has been reached insist that homework be packed away (you can ask for the teacher's input on how long it should be taking and add an extra 20 minutes). Never make excuses for her to her teacher regarding incomplete homework, allow her to take responsibility for this.

Best wishes,
Delia

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2
user comments

C.

Posted by: ADD/ADHD Expert | 2011/01/21

Dear mom2two,

Your concerns are all very valid and deciding between balance and work ethic is never easy.

If her homework is taking too much time purely because of concentration and not due to a lack of understanding, reducing her homework further will likely not change things as she will simply have more time at her disposal to 'dilly dally'.

As she feels a sense of accomplishment and pride on completing her homework, the possibility of not having those positive feelings can be an incentive to make a change.

Assuming she has a quiet, non-distracting, organised space in which to work in, providing a clear structure for homework time she may be able to complete it quicker. Develop a timetable which includes working for 20 minutes separated by 5 minute breaks with a slightly longer break every two or three sessions to get a snack or something to drink. Keep a timer in her room that can be set to ring when the study session and breaks are over so that she is aware of the amount of time passing. Set a reasonable time limit for the days homework and once it has been reached insist that homework be packed away (you can ask for the teacher's input on how long it should be taking and add an extra 20 minutes). Never make excuses for her to her teacher regarding incomplete homework, allow her to take responsibility for this.

Best wishes,
Delia

Reply to ADD/ADHD Expert
Posted by: Eric | 2011/01/20

She could also be Autistic  that is on the high functioning side of the spectrum as in Aspergers Syndrome. I would definitely have her checked for this.

Reply to Eric

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