ADHD

Question
Posted by: Sue | 2009/10/13

Q.

9 yr old with ADHD

Hi Doc

My daughter is 9, she was diagnosed with ADHD by her Paed at age 7, after her teacher suggested testing for it. Her Paed suspected it it from age 4, but wanted to monitor it through her first year of primary school.

She has been on Straterra for the last 2 years, and whilst it helps her alot, we still have some very rough days. I know that is to be expected, but she has these overemotional over reactions and is like a terrier with a bone, the tantrums are pretty bad when they happen, and at the end it all, I feel like an absolute failure.

I'  m a single mom, I dont have any support structure at all, so I cant bounce ideas or stresses of anyone. My daughter pushes me to the very edge of sanity, and I end up feeling like a completely useless mother. I

'  ve bought books on ADHD, and they are very helpfull, but when one of these everemotional excessive events kicks off, I just dont know what to do and how to best handle it anymore.

Any advice?

Thank you so much!

Expert's Reply

A.

ADHD Expert

Dear Sue,
Dealing with temper tantrums is never an easy task. Children will push the boundaries - its partly how social behaviours are learnt. If she asks for something and the answer is no, she will ask again and again until you give in. If you ignore her second attempt she will eventually realise that what mom said goes, and reduces the opportunity for fights. It's easier said than done, I know, but it does work. Initially she will throw a temper tantrum, and they are likely to get very bad before they get better; you can either ignore her or move her to a passage or someplace equally boring, until she tires herself out. The key to both these techniques is not to engage in any conversation, not even to the extent of "I said no". The minute you respond to a nag or a tantrum in any way, they have your attention and intend to keep it. She will soon realise that talking things through with you will get her more attention, and more positive attention. Things are likely to get

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1
user comments

C.

Posted by: ADD/ADHD Expert | 2009/10/14

Dear Sue,
Dealing with temper tantrums is never an easy task. Children will push the boundaries - its partly how social behaviours are learnt. If she asks for something and the answer is no, she will ask again and again until you give in. If you ignore her second attempt she will eventually realise that what mom said goes, and reduces the opportunity for fights. It's easier said than done, I know, but it does work. Initially she will throw a temper tantrum, and they are likely to get very bad before they get better; you can either ignore her or move her to a passage or someplace equally boring, until she tires herself out. The key to both these techniques is not to engage in any conversation, not even to the extent of "I said no". The minute you respond to a nag or a tantrum in any way, they have your attention and intend to keep it. She will soon realise that talking things through with you will get her more attention, and more positive attention. Things are likely to get

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