ADHD

Question
Posted by: Sue | 2011/04/19

Q.

11 yr old with behavioural issues

Hi,

I''m a single mom of an 11 year old daughter who was diagnosed with ADHD in Grade 1. She has been on Straterra since then, but it seems each year at school the problems crop up. The meds have worked very well with regards to her concentration etc, but her behaviour is still a big problem.
Each year (excluding last year) I have been called in numerous times by the class teacher, and it always involves aggression, fighting, and the list goes on.
My daughter is now in Grade 5, and going through puberty, which seems to have compounded the problem. The teacher just phoned me to say there have been numerous incidents this morning with fighting and pushing etc, with my child in the middle of it all.
I''ve tried threatening her, talking to her, punishing her - it works for all of 5 minutes and then she does it all over again.
I''m at my wits end, I cant afford private counselling, the school counsellor doesnt seem to be helping, and I dont know what to do that will be effective - please can you help?
Thanks

Expert's Reply

A.

ADHD Expert

Dear Sue,

Applying good boundaries and consistent consequences for her behaviour will help. However, if she denies these things being her fault either she truly believes there was no other way to handle the situation or she is being manipulative in an attempt to shift blame. Giving her the tools to better deal with the situations she keeps being involved in will enable her to better handle situations - it will then be her responsibility to make the best choice and then deal with the consequences.

Kind regards,
Delia

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1
user comments

C.

Posted by: ADD/ADHD Expert | 2011/04/19

Dear Sue,

Applying good boundaries and consistent consequences for her behaviour will help. However, if she denies these things being her fault either she truly believes there was no other way to handle the situation or she is being manipulative in an attempt to shift blame. Giving her the tools to better deal with the situations she keeps being involved in will enable her to better handle situations - it will then be her responsibility to make the best choice and then deal with the consequences.

Kind regards,
Delia

Reply to ADD/ADHD Expert

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