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14 October 2010

Yoga can counteract fibromyalgia

According to new research yoga exercises may have the power to combat fibromyalgia — a medical disorder characterised by chronic widespread pain.

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According to new research conducted at Oregon Health & Science University, yoga exercises may have the power to combat fibromyalgia — a medical disorder characterised by chronic widespread pain. The research is being published in the November 10 online edition of the journal Pain and will appear online.

"Previous research suggests that the most successful treatment for fibromyalgia involves a combination of medications, physical exercise and development of coping skills," said James Carson, Ph.D., a clinical health psychologist and an assistant professor of anesthesiology and perioperative medicine in the OHSU School of Medicine. "Here, we specifically focused on yoga to determine whether it should be considered as a prescribed treatment and the extent to which it can be successful."

The study

In this study, researchers enrolled 53 female study subjects previously diagnosed with fibromyalgia. The women were randomly assigned to two research groups. The first group participated in an eight-week yoga program, which included gentle poses, meditation, breathing exercises and group discussions. The second group of women — the control group — received standard medication treatments for fibromyalgia.

Following completion of the yoga program, researchers assessed each study subject using questionnaires and physical tests. The results were then compared with testing results obtained prior to the yoga classes. The members of the control group underwent the same evaluations. In addition, each participant in the yoga group was urged to keep a daily diary to personally assess their condition throughout the entire program.

Comparison of the data for the two groups revealed that yoga appears to assist in combating a number of serious fibromyalgia symptoms, including pain, fatigue, stiffness, poor sleep, depression, poor memory, anxiety and poor balance.

Improvements shown

All of these improvements were shown to be not only statistically but also clinically significant, meaning the changes were large enough to have a practical impact on daily functioning. For example, pain was reduced in the yoga group by an average of 24%, fatigue by 30% and depression by 42%.

"One likely reason for the apparent success of this study therapy was the strong commitment shown by the study subjects. Attendance at the classes was good as was most participants' willingness to practice yoga while at home," added Carson. "Based on the results of this research, we strongly believe that further study of this potential therapy is warranted."

As an outcome of this study and Carson's previous research showing yoga can be helpful with cancer-related pain, next June the OHSU Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine will be sponsoring a training course for US and Canadian yoga teachers who want to build their skills for working with individuals who have chronic pain. (EurikaAlert!/October 2010)

Read more:
Yoga may ease chemotherapy
Yoga helps cancer survivors

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