10 August 2011

Bullying affects high school test scores

Students attending high schools dominated by bullies are more likely to have lower standardised test scores, a new study shows.


Students attending high schools dominated by bullies are more likely to have lower standardised test scores, a new study shows.

In fact, researchers in Virginia found that school wide passing rates on three different standardised exams (Algebra I, Earth Science and World History) were 3% to 6% lower in schools where students reported a more severe bullying climate. The findings, they added, highlight the fact that bullying is a pervasive problem in schools.

"Our study suggests that a bullying climate may play an important role in student test performance," Dewey Cornell, a clinical psychologist and a professor of education at the University of Virginia, said. "This research underscores the importance of treating bullying as a school wide problem rather than just an individual problem."

In conducting the study, researchers compiled surveys about bullying from more than 7,300 Grade 9 learners and about 3,000 teachers at 284 Virginia high schools. The researchers pointed out that even a 3% to 6% drop in test scores associated with bullying is significant.

School-wide bullying programmes needed

Under the federal No Child Left Behind Act, students must receive a passing grade on these standardised tests to graduate. Moreover, in the state of Virginia at least 70% of a school's students must pass the tests for the school to keep its state accreditation.

"This difference is substantial because it affects the school's ability to meet federal requirements and the educational success of many students who don't pass the exams," said Cornell. "This study supports the case for school-wide bullying prevention programmes as a step to improve school climate and facilitate academic achievement."

The researchers argued the poor academic performance was due to the fact that students are less engaged in learning when they are afraid about bullying. They also suggested bullying leads to a greater level of school disorder, which may have negatively affected test scores.

The study authors noted bullying programmes should not only provide help for victims, but also counselling and discipline for bullies. Bystanders, they added, should also be discouraged from supporting bullying.

"We have always had bullying in our schools. What has changed is we have become more aware of bullying due to a series of high-profile tragic cases involving school shootings and suicides," concluded Cornell. "Our society does not permit harassment and abuse of adults in the workplace, and the same protections should be afforded to children in school."

More information

The American Academy of Pediatrics provides more information on bullying.

SOURCE: American Psychological Association, news release, Aug. 7, 2011

(Copyright © 2010 HealthDay. All rights reserved.)




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