Updated 08 April 2014

Pistorius dabbled in dagga

Paralympian Oscar Pistorius smoked dagga when his mother died but stopped, he told the High Court in Pretoria on Monday.


Paralympian Oscar Pistorius smoked dagga when his mother died but stopped, he told the High Court in Pretoria on Monday.

"In the month and a half, My Lady... when my mother passed away when I was 15, I smoked dagga with a friend," he said during testimony in his murder trial.

"I haven't taken any substances since then."

He had not taken anything that gave him an advantage over his competitors at the Paralympic or Olympic events he participated in.


Young athletes use less drugs, more alcohol

Oscar has also said that he currently takes the antidepressant Cipralex and the sedative Loprazolam

He also drank alcohol

He drank alcohol, but not in the pre-season from November until Christmas.

He said he went away with family and friends for Christmas. From the beginning of January to September he did not drink.

From September to October he fulfilled sponsorship commitments, travelled a lot and drank on the plane and with friends.

He said that before a boating accident on the Vaal he had one drink but was not intoxicated.

Read: Genetically altered athletes: fact or fiction?

Mistaken for an intruder

Pistorius is on trial for the murder of his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp, who was shot through the locked toilet door of his Pretoria home on February 14 last year.

He says he had mistaken her for an intruder. He has pleaded not guilty and in his plea statement denied he had argued with her shortly before the shooting.

He also faces two charges related to contravening the Firearms Control Act, to which he has denied guilt.

Read more:

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When accused of doping, athletes claim innocence, could the doping tests be wrong?



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