advertisement
12 September 2006

10% more nicotine for smokers

The largest US cigarette maker is denying the conclusions of a study that cites a steady increase in cigarettes' nicotine levels over the past six years.

0
The largest US cigarette maker is denying the conclusions of a Massachusetts government study that cites a steady increase in cigarettes' nicotine levels over the past six years, the Associated Press reported Monday.

Philip Morris USA, whose most famous brand is Marlboro, said nicotine levels may have fluctuated in cigarettes, but denies the purposeful, steady rise cited by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, the wire service reported.

"There are variations in the nicotine yield for different Marlboro packings, both up and down from year-to-year, but there is no general trend up or down," according to a company statement cited by the AP.

The state study released last month evaluated more than 100 brands over six years. The researchers concluded that regardless of brand, nicotine yields had risen in cigarettes by about 10% during the span.

Massachusetts is one of three states that requires cigarette makers to submit periodic reports of nicotine levels in their products, the wire service said. The state reportedly has the oldest data going back to 1997. -(HealthDayNews, September 2006)

Read more:
Smoker's fix lasts only 30 minutes
Nicotine overrated

 
NEXT ON HEALTH24X
advertisement

Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
0 comments
Comments have been closed for this article.

Live healthier

Dangerous winter sun »

Why female students ignore the risks of indoor tanning Can rooibos protect you from the effects of UVB exposure?

Skin cancer always a risk – even in winter

During winter, the risk of skin cancer doesn’t disappear. CyberDoc talks to us about when to see your doctor about a strange-looking mole or spot.

Did you know? »

The 5 saltiest foods may surprise you Craving salt? Your genes may be the reason

10 fascinating facts about salt

The one thing that fast foods, whether it be chips, hamburgers, pretzels or fried chicken have in common, is loads of salt.