17 January 2014

Paddle boarding with your dog in Rio

In Rio de Janeiro dogs take to the waves with their owners for a stand-up paddle board race.

Selva the surfer wore a lime-green life vest, but her colleagues braved the waters without protection. All of them could at least doggie paddle if they fell off their boards.

About a dozen four-legged practitioners of stand-up paddle boarding took to the waves with their human owners off Rio de Janeiro's Barra Beach, practicing for a second annual competition next month in which canine-human teams race around buoys. Competitors are disqualified if the dog falls into the water.

"The idea started when I was on my board and my dog was tied up on the beach. I said to myself, 'Man he wants to come to the water!' so I put him on the board and he loved it," said Marco Sarnelli, the event organiser.

The race is expected to draw as many as 50 dogs and their owners, from border collies to golden retrievers to mutts.

'A sport everybody can do'

Iracema Braun, a stand-up paddle teacher who charges just over $100 a month to take dog lovers and their canines out on the waters twice a week, said that it's "a sport everybody can do. You don't have to be an athlete to do it... any dog can do it."

Brazilian paddle board enthusiasts aren't the first to take their pets out on the water.

Canine paddle board races in California have served as fundraisers for local shelters, and several websites dedicated to the sport include forum sections with readers trading tricks on how to get their dogs hooked on the sport.

Here's a quick video on how to best paddle with your dog:



Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Live healthier

Exercise benefits for seniors »

Working out in the concrete jungle Even a little exercise may help prevent dementia Here’s an unexpected way to boost your memory: running

Seniors who exercise recover more quickly from injury or illness

When sedentary older adults got into an exercise routine, it curbed their risk of suffering a disabling injury or illness and helped them recover if anything did happen to them.