15 June 2007

Can you be a better dad than your dad?

We know that a single ice-cold beer after mowing the lawn is as therapeutic as an entire week at a health spa. It's the same with parenting.


Guys? Of course we’re different. We find as much fulfillment in seeing the Proteas plunder 13 runs off the Aussies in an over as we do in all three hours of Les Misérables. We know that a single ice-cold beer after mowing the lawn is as therapeutic as an entire week at a health spa. It's the same with parenting.

We realise that having seen Uma Thurman rise as Venus from the waves in The Adventures of Baron von Munchausen is at least as important as knowing who shot JFK, what women find sexy in Bill Clinton or having a neat sock drawer. And we will never, ever forget holding that baby for the first time.

So when it comes to parenting, our approach is different too. All those magazines aimed at mothers are fine, but someone turned the precious-and-quaint knob up until it broke off. And while these magazines, with their pastel hues and ads for things we didn’t know existed are fine, they’re don’t address the issues that affect us.

While we will remain forever grateful for the role billions of mothers continue to play around the world each day, and to our own for nurturing us, we feel the role of dads has been underplayed.

Perhaps that’s because so many dads see their role as being pivotal to the continued well-being of their local pub, rather than their kids. It may be that they simply don’t know where to begin or haven’t had good role models – or perhaps they’re just slobs.

But for those of you who are committed fathers or fathers-to-be, who want to understand your role in your kids’ lives, who aim to be better dads than your dads were, this site is for you.

You see, we know that being a good father is difficult. However much you might try, mothers still shoulder the bulk of the workload. This is even more the case when a second child is born. It’s the result of many factors such as the industrial revolution. All are reasons, none are excuses.

Do you know any man who has the right balance – nurturing his kids while disciplining them, maintaining a civil and intimate relationship with his wife, giving his best to his career each day and still finding time to stay fit, get enough sleep and work on his short game? Neither do we.

If you inherited half a dozen large yachts and a villa in Spain, then you’re likely to have enough time to lead a perfectly balanced family life. For the rest of us, it’s hard. It’s a process. The goalposts move. But you want to keep at it, because you know that there are precious few fathers who get it right. Those who do are loved and remembered in ways the rest could simply never imagine.

So, we’re here to help, whether you’re trying to sire an heir to the kingdom or dealing with a partner who has cravings for sardine and condensed milk crackers. We have what you need to survive, whether you’re a sleep-deprived shadow of your former self, trying to get a toddler to sleep through and eat his porridge, or a seasoned father of four, worrying about the kids buying E at raves. We can help, whether you’re a divorced dad or a harried stepfather.

We’ll provide you will cogent, practical advice on everything about being a father, from sex education – how to make a baby – to sex education – how to teach your kids about it. Check out ourChild Zone.



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