01 July 2008

How do I shave my head?

There's something sexy and tough about a man with a bald head. Do it today!


Male pattern baldness is a reality, so instead of acquiring a road-kill toupee or mastering the comb over, why not shave your head. Think Jean-Luc Picard (Patrick Stewart), Vin Diesel and Andre Agassi.

Here’s how to do it:

  • First give yourself a brush cut with electric clippers with a number one or a number two attachment.
  • Hop into a hot shower for ten minutes – the steam will open your skin’s pores and will soften the hair.
  • Soak a facecloth in warm water, then lightly soap it and, starting at the back of the head, run it upward against the grain of your hair. This will lift the hair making it easier to shave off.
  • Rinse off your scalp and then rinse the facecloth in warm water and put it on your head for one to two minutes. This will further soften the hairs, preventing post-shave razor burn.
  • Splash warm water over your head and apply shaving cream or gel. Leave the shaving preparation on for three minutes.
  • Make sure that the blade is sharp, then clean your razor with very hot water.
  • Using a mirror to see what you’re doing, shave as much hair off as you can in one sweep. Do not shave over the same spot twice.
  • Start shaving at the back of your head where the hair is usually at it’s fullest, then move to areas where the hair is thinning.
  • Run your hands through your…sorry, over your head to see if you’ve missed any spots.
  • Rinse off all shaving debris and apply a moisturising aftershave or a moisturiser with an SPF.
  • Exfoliate your skin at least twice a week before the next shave. This will stop ingrown hairs and will remove dead skin cells.

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