26 January 2011

Sandpits - problems & solutions

As animals often use sandpits as toilets, children can be infected with bacteria while playing.


Sandpits - why this could be a problem

Sandpits, a delightful place for children to play, are unfortunately not without their potential problems.

Animals, who carry germs in their faeces, often use sandpits as toilets. These disease-causing bacteria can be passed on to children when they play in sandpits or to pets that can spread the germs indoors. Diseases, such as gastroenteritis and ringworm, are spread in this way.

How to keep your sandpit clean

A sandpit bring the joy of beach sand to your doorstep. But like many good things in life, it also comes with its pwn problems. Rake your sandpit once a week to remove droppings and other dirt or rubbish. Wash the sand with water and keep it as dry as possible. Always cover your sandpit when you're not using it, but make sure you air it once in a while.

Handy hint
A large built-in sandpit can become a problem, especially if your children have grown up. One can buy a portable hard plastic kiddies' pool and fill it with sand bought at a hardware store, which can be thrown away at the end of the summer. The nice thing is that the clam-type kiddies pools come with a plastic cover, which will keep domestic animals out. 

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