31 January 2011

The sink - problems & solutions

To clean a metal or porcelain sink, use a strong anti-bacterial detergent, this will dissolve food and microbial material; bleach will get rid of any other bacteria.


The sink - why this could be a problem 

There's a car sticker that says, "First you sink into his arms and then you end up with your arms in his sink". Not a very romantic notion, but whether we like it or not, the kitchen sink is a very central part of any household. 

Foodborne bacteria love kitchen sinks. They are warm, often get wet, often have food particles floating around and don't get cleaned as often as they should. The germs that lurk here could include salmonella. E.coli, Campylobacter, Clostridium perfringens and Staphylococcus aureus. Germs also like lurking in and on the kitchen tap and in the plughole and U-bend. Sink drainage pipes often get clogged up with discarded foodstuffs and dirty dishwater, making them ideal breeding grounds for potentially harmful bacteria.  

How to keep the kitchen sink clean

It may not be your idea of a favourite pastime, but the kitchen sink should be washed every day with anti-bacterial cleanser or bleach. This sorts out a lot of problems before they can get a foothold. 

To clean a metal or porcelain sink, use a strong anti-bacterial detergent as this will dissolve most of the food and the microbial material and the bleach will get rid of any bacteria that are left.

To get rid of scuff marks, use a paste of baking soda and water. Foodstuffs, sour milk and other liquids, except water, should not be thrown down the sink. It is better to flush these down the toilet. It is a good idea to put drain cleaner down the sink once every week or two, just to get rid of anything that might be caught in the U-bend. Slow drainage and unpleasant smells should alert you to blockages.

Handy hint:
When washing up, the hotter the water is, the better. If you wear rubber gloves while washing up, you will be able to tolerate much higher temperatures than without them.

The stove
The sponge
The fridge
The floor
The counters
The cutting board
The bin
The air
The ambience


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