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06 December 2012

Extroverted gorillas enjoy longer lives

Gorillas with an extroverted personality may live longer than their more introverted peers, a study suggests.

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An international team of researchers looked at the role of personality by studying 298 gorillas in North American zoos and sanctuaries for over 18 years.

The gorillas' personalities were assessed by keepers, volunteers, researchers and caretakers who knew the gorillas well. Their personality was scored with measures adapted from techniques for studying people and other primates.

Researchers found that out of four personality traits – dominance, extroversion, neuroticism and agreeableness – extroversion, which was associated with behaviours such as sociability, activity, play and curiosity, was linked with longer survival.

The study found that the link between extraversion and survival was not affected by age or gender, rearing condition or how many times the gorilla had moved location.

Extroverts may live longer

Researchers say these findings are consistent with studies in people which found that extroverts tend to live longer.

The study, carried out on western lowland gorillas is important in understanding how the relationship between personality and longevity of life evolved.

Dr Alex Weiss, of the University of Edinburgh's School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences, said: "These findings highlight how understanding the natural history of personality is vital to insuring the continued health and well-being of humans, gorillas and other great apes."

(EurekAlert, December 2012)

Read more:

Gorilla sheds light on evolution

 
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