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30 October 2006

Diesel fumes make kids wheeze

A New York University study has found a link between motor vehicle exhaust fumes and an increased incidence of asthma and other respiratory ailments.

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A New York University study that had school children in the South Bronx - a high density urban area - carry air pollution monitors in their backpacks, has found a link between motor vehicle exhaust fumes and increased incidence of asthma and other respiratory ailments.

The New York Times reports that average daily exposure to fine particle pollution regularly exceeded US government standards. The measurements were taken over a three year period.

"I think it's an indicator that these kids are being exposed to very high fine-particle concentrations on a fairly regular basis," the Times quotes NYU researcher Dr George Thurston as saying. Particularly damaging appears to be diesel exhaust fumes. The children in the study live and go to school near a number of expressways in the South Bronx.

About 5-10 percent of the fine particle pollution was from diesel exhaust, but Thurston told the newspaper that its effect on the children caused doubling of symptoms like wheezing on days with heavy truck traffic.

Officials hope to use the study findings to help create new vehicle pollution standards in new York State. – (HealthDayNews)

Read more:
Enviro health Centre
Asthma Centre

October 2006

 
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