Updated 30 March 2015

What's Your Diagnosis? – Case 4: Seeing odd things

Mrs T, an eccentric former fashion designer with poor eyesight, started seeing rather strange objects. Put on your white coat and try to solve this week's case of "What's your Diagnosis?"


Mrs T (65) has always been described as somewhat ‘odd’. As a former fashion designer for the stars, she likes dressing up in unique attire.

Two years ago, Mrs T had to retire from designing when she started having difficulty reading and recognising faces. She bought over-the-counter reading glasses, which did not really make a difference. 

Mrs T enjoys reading and writing, and not being able to do this anymore is very troubling for her.

Mrs T’s daughter is not very happy with her mother as she refuses to see a doctor. Her eyesight is worsening and she is complaining of headaches most days of the week.

She became particularly concerned when her mother phoned her, saying that she was “fed up with the stupid cat following her around”. Mrs T does not own a cat.

One night, Mrs T’s daughter received a very disturbing phone call from her mother. Mrs T was very upset, complaining that there was a life-sized Barbie doll wearing a dress made of scissors in her bedroom. 

Her daughter initially thought her mother was joking because she couldn't sleep, but when she started crying she became very concerned.

Mrs T said, “I know what I see is silly and makes no sense, but I can’t seem to get rid of it.”

The next morning Mrs T’s daughter finally decides to take her mother to her GP.

What’s your diagnosis? Join the guesswork on our Facebook page, or comment below. 

NOTE: Health24's on-site GP Dr Owen Wiese will reveal new cases on Thursdays and we'll post the answer with the story on Mondays, or you can find out via the Daily Tip – sign up here.

Previously on What's Your Diagnosis

What's your diagnosis? – Case 1: vomiting and weight loss
What's your diagnosis? – Case 2: eye pain
What's your diagnosis Case 3: strange behaviour and a bullet in the back?

Dr. Owen J. Wiese is Health24's resident doctor. After graduating from Stellenbosch University with additional qualifications in biochemistry and physiology he developed a keen interest in providing medical information through the media.


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