advertisement
05 October 2015

Answer: What's your diagnosis? – Case 31

Mr Z became very concerned when noticing that his urine had turned orange. It turns out that his medication might be the cause.

0

Mr Z, a 27-year-old office administrator, presents to his GP with a history of passing orange urine. Read the full case here.

Although orange urine might be distressing, the explanation is simple. A change in the colour of urine is usually due to medicines or food. Often patients who eat a lot of beetroot think they have blood in their urine.

The same applies to medicines. A TB drug, rifampicin, changes the colour of urine to a striking orange. Patients who are not aware of this side effects may be alarmed. Based on the case history of Mr Z, this might be the case. The presence of his constitutional symptoms (coughing, night sweats and weight loss) suggest that the doctor started him on TB treatment.

Read: Breakthrough: scientists trace the origins of extreme drug-resistant TB

Mr Z should not be worried by the bright orange colour of his urine as it is most likely caused by the medication he is taking.

Dark brown urine may indicate poor fluid intake, and the subsequent concentrated urine often appears dark. Vitamin tablets can also change the colour of urine to a bright yellow or orange. However, red urine may indicate blood in the urine and should be investigated.

NOTE: Health24's on-site GP Dr Owen Wiese reveals new cases on Thursdays. The answer is posted with the story on Mondays, or you can get it in our Daily Tip – sign up here.

Previously on What's Your Diagnosis?

What's your diagnosis? -  Case 1: vomiting and weight loss

What's your diagnosis? -  Case 2: eye pain

What's your diagnosis? -  Case 3: strange behaviour and a bullet in the back

What's your diagnosis? -  Case 4: seeing odd things

What's your diagnosis? - Case 5: mysterious lungs

What's your diagnosis? - Case 6: runner with seizures

What's your diagnosis? - Case 7: swollen knee

What's your diagnosis? - Case 8: bloody semen

What's your diagnosis? - Case 9: confusing neurological signs

What's your diagnosis? - Case 10: diabetic teenager with unusual signs and symptoms

What's your diagnosis? - Case 11: bruising with no apparent reason

What's your diagnosis? - Case 12: severe tummy pain

What's your diagnosis? - Case 13: severe sore throat

What's your diagnosis? - Case 14: abdominal pain and swelling

What's your diagnosis? - Case 15: the world is spinning

What's your diagnosis? - Case 16: numbness in forearm

What's your diagnosis? - Case 17: burning urine

What's your diagnosis? - Case 18: boy with persistent fever

What's your diagnosis? – Case 19: lady who can't lose weight

What's your diagnosis? – Case 20: chest pain next to breastbone

What's your diagnosis? – Case 21: burning sensation in vagina

What's your diagnosis? – Case 22: vomiting and headaches

What's your diagnosis? – Case 23: frequent urination

What's your diagnosis? – Case 24: painful and swollen leg

What's your diagnosis? – Case 25: swollen knee and fever

What's your diagnosis? – Case 26: swelling of face

What's your diagnosis? – Case 27: sudden severe leg pain

What's your diagnosis? – Case 28: painful ear

What's your diagnosis? – Case 29: tired and drained

What's your diagnosis? – Case 30: persistent anal itch

What's your diagnosis? – Case 31: orange urine

 
NEXT ON HEALTH24X
advertisement

Live healthier

Watch out! »

Gross fungal infections you can pick up at the gym

You go to gym to exercise. But make sure the only thing you pick up is a dumbbell and not one of these gross fungal infections.

Holiday health »

Your 10-step asthma holiday checklist

Don’t let asthma ruin your summer holiday. Whether you are travelling or embracing the summer at home, make sure you plan ahead.