01 August 2003

Washboard abs are a fulltime job

Washboard abs are the ideal when it comes to being in shape. And for those men want to give it a try, here are some tips.

Want abdominals to do your washing on? Sure you do - women love to touch it (yeah!), and it does wonders for your posture. But, getting that elusive six-pack is a fulltime job for many.

Washboard abs are the ideal when it comes to being in shape. However, it's not a realistic ideal for most men, just as the media-generated female image is not perfection to most women. But for those men want to give it a try anyway, here are some tips:

First, quit your job. You will need the extra time to work on your abs. One male model who has a near-perfect body says he starts his day with an hour on the treadmill, burning 1 000 calories. Then he begins his workout. The workout could include a minimum of 50 sit-ups a day, plus several hours in the gym, five or six days a week. And that's just to maintain his physique. Getting that "ripped look" is a full-time pursuit, he says.

Second, spend lots of time in the weight room, but remember you also have to emphasise cardiovascular workouts and be very strict about your diet. If you're thin, use heavier weights and fewer repetitions. If you're heavy, work with lighter weights and do more repetitions.

When it comes to your diet, resist the urge to reward yourself for a good day in the gym by pigging out at the snack bar. We're talking no fried food, no junk food, light on the fat, heavy on the protein. If a diet centred around egg whites, turkey bacon and dry toast sounds good to you, you're all set.




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