06 November 2006

Run with Maryann: Week 4

Maryann had a great week on the road. Here's how she did it.

We had a great week. On the road, that is.

Week 4's training programme:
Warm-up walking for 5 mins, then
5 mins run
2 mins walk
5mins run
2 mins walk
10 mins run
2 mins walk
5 mins run

We trained three days a week. On the third day, we upped the 10 mins to 12 mins, so we are running about 5km.

We changed venues and ran along the promenade from the Mouille Point lighthouse in Cape Town, and the change of scenery and breathing the sea air, was quite refreshing. Varying your routes is a good idea to prevent boredom.

I am drinking lots of water during the day, and I eat a good snack an hour or two before running, generally a carb like an oats bar.

Kathy McQuaide, sports scientist at the Sorts Science Institute of SA (SSISA), gave us advice on uphill and downhill running this week:

Running uphill is an excellent way to build up strength, in that you are, in a sense, forcing your hips, legs, ankles and feet to work together in a coordinated fashion, whilst carrying your full body weight.

Many runners make the mistake of either running downhill with complete abandon, i.e. much too fast which causes severe muscle soreness later, or they’re so careful that they’re constantly braking, which fatigues the quadriceps (front thigh) muscles. The key to efficient downhill running, is to stay in control and to run at a pace that is somewhere in between the two.

Running with other people helps you to stay motivated. Definitely having a running buddy is the way to go. Four weeks down, with 8 weeks to go, I think a 10km race will be comfortable by the time we get there. - (Maryann Shaw)

Don't forget to stretch. Here are the 12 best stretches.

Follow our online programme to run 10km in 11 weeks.
Here is week 4.




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