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Rugby

Rugby neck injuries

If a rugby player suffers a serious injury in this category, death or permanent disability may be the result.

Rugby shoulder injuries

Shoulder injuries are common in rugby: up to 15-20% of all rugby injuries involve this part of the body.

Rugby groin injuries

Groin injuries are not only one of the main causes of missed games, but many players with chronic groin pain have their performances severely affected by the condition.

Rugby knee injuries

The knee is a vulnerable joint. Ligaments and cartilage can be injured as players get tackled, when quickly changing direction whilst running and within rucks and mauls.

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Rugby chest injuries

Injuries to the chest are not common. Only 0 - 5% of all injuries sustained on the field are chest injuries.

Rugby upper leg injuries

Rugby kickers are particularly vulnerable to an injury to the quadriceps as these are used extensively when kicking the ball. Backs are also at risk due to sudden sprinting.

Osteitis pubis in rugby

Rugby players can suffer this injury from the cumulative effect of the shearing movement involved in kicking the ball.

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