06 April 2011

Breaking 80, 90, 100

When you're in the Think Box, you're assessing the shot at hand. The next step is moving into the Play Box.


Breaking 80

'The think box': Getting ready for the shot
When you're in the Think Box, you're assessing the shot at hand. What are the conditions - is it windy, wet, dry? What's the yardage and shape of the hole? Once you're off the tee, how about the lie - is it scruffy, in a divot, sitting up? Based on the information you've processed in The Think Box, you're now ready to make a club selection. The next step is moving into the Play Box.

"The Play Box": All systems go
You should have complete awareness of the target and a total lack of self-awareness. The only thing you should be focusing on is the target. It's time to swing the club and make the shot you've prepared for.

Breaking 90

Keep weight towards the balls of your feet

When golfers are told to set up as if they were sitting, they often misinterpret this and end up sitting back on their heels. You can't dance, walk, or play golf with your weight on the back of your heels.

To perform any activity that requires movement, your weight should be towards the balls of your feet. Feel as if you can tap your heels on the ground. It's an athletic, ready-to-move position. Correct posture and weight distribution makes your swing more fluid.

Breaking 100

Take a grip that fits you

The word 'grip' is misleading. Instead, think of placing your hands on the club. The key word is softness. Try shaking your hands when your fists are clenched. It's a chore. But if you loosen up, it's a lot easier to flap them around rapidly.

Since increased clubhead speed produces more distance, we need to keep our hands tension-free throughout the swing.

The 'dainty' drill helps develop this awareness. Hold on to the grip with your thumbs and index fingers only. As you swing the club, you will feel the force rather than force the feel.

From the editors of Golf Digest
By Jane Frost, A Golf Digest 50 Greatest Teacher




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