06 April 2011

Advanced faults & fixers

very common problem we see every day is incorrect alignment.


Week 1

A very common problem we see every day is incorrect alignment. Without lining up correctly you will not stand a chance to hit a consistent shot. Often bad alignment gets ingrained on the practice tee.

When you practice from now on always make sure that you have a club on the ground, parallel to the target line, to assist you with the correct alignment.

On the golf course pick a spot about 2 feet ahead of the golf ball. This spot should be directly in line with the target. The intermediate target will make it easy to line up correctly and therefore hit consistent shots.

Week 2

A very common fault is an incorrect take away. The club can be taken back too much on the inside or on the outside, of the target line. This will lead to an inconsistent position at the top of the back swing.

Place a club on the ground along the target line and take the club back along that line for the first part of the take away. Although the club will eventually start swinging around the body, the first part needs to be along the target line. At waist height the club will be parallel to the club on the ground.

Week 3

A very common problem is the lack of weight transfer on the back swing. Instead of the weight moving back on the back swing the weight stays on the front leg. This position is commonly referred to as the reverse pivot.

A good way of encouraging a better weight transference is to sweep the club away from the ball, low along the ground. As the club swings further away from the body, the weight will move onto the back leg.

Week 4

Generally the harder we try to hit the ball, the shorter we hit it. The reason this happens is because we use our body to hit the ball. Our body then gets ahead of the hands. This gets the club in an open position at impact, resulting in a weak shot that goes to the right.

An excellent way to fix the problem is to place the feet together and hit shots with a half swing using the arms and the hands. This will give you the feeling of how the arms and the hands should be working together correctly. If you try to use too much body you will lose balance. This exercise will also help the hands to speed up, creating more club head speed and get the club in a better position.

Week 5

If your chipping becomes inconsistent with thin and fat the likely fault would be that the weight moved on the back foot. To get the club to the ball you will tend to scoop at the ball causing these miss hits.

A good way to fix the problem is to practise with the right heel of the ground. This will force the weight on the front foot where it should remain throughout the shot. This will promote hitting the ball with a descending blow, which will get the loft to lift the ball.


Week 6

A putting stoke will move straight back and through along the target line. If you struggling with this aspect of your putting, there is an easy way of fixing the problem. Place two clubs on the ground parallel to each other.                             

The distance between the shafts should be slightly more than a putter width. Practice your stroke without touching the shafts. This will ingrain the correct stroke. 

Week 7

If you are struggling with your pitching, hitting various kinds of inconsistent shots, it could be because the hands and the arms are trying to do too much work. A good way to fix the problem is to practice with a towel under the right armpit.

This will encourage you to make a more unified swing were your chest and arms rotate together back and through the shot.
This is a great way to solve your pitching problems.




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