advertisement
Updated 01 September 2015

Short spurts of exercise can improve kids' health

Researchers found that brief bouts of activity during otherwise inactive periods could help protect children against type 2 diabetes, heart disease and cancer.

0

Even brief spurts of exercise may benefit children, researchers report.

Their study of 28 healthy, normal-weight children found that doing three minutes of moderate-intensity walking every half hour over three hours of sitting led to lower levels of blood sugar and insulin, compared to another day when the children sat for three hours straight.

Moderate physical activity

On the day the children took brief walks, they did not eat any more at lunch than on the day they remained seated for the entire three hours, according to the study published online in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

Read: 7 ways to make fitness fun

The findings suggest that brief bouts of activity during otherwise inactive periods could help protect children against type 2 diabetes, heart disease and cancer, the U.S. National Institutes of Health researchers said.

"We know that 30 minutes or more of moderate physical activity benefits children's health," study senior author Dr Jack Yanovski, chief of the section on growth and obesity at the U.S. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, said in a government news release.

"It can be difficult to fit longer stretches of physical activity into the day. Our study indicates that even small activity breaks could have a substantial impact on children's long-term health," he added.

Clearing sugar from the bloodstream

American children spend about six hours a day either sitting or reclining, the researchers said. Previous studies have linked such inactivity to obesity and insulin resistance, a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, the researchers explained.

"Sustained sedentary behaviour after a meal diminishes the muscles' ability to help clear sugar from the bloodstream," study first author Britni Belcher, a cancer prevention fellow at the U.S. National Cancer Institute and an assistant professor at the University of Southern California, said in the news release.

Read: A healthy body equals a healthy brain

"That forces the body to produce more insulin, which may increase the risk for beta cell dysfunction that can lead to the onset of type 2 diabetes. Our findings suggest even short activity breaks can help overcome these negative effects, at least in the short term," Belcher explained.

More than one-third of American children and teens are overweight or obese, which increases their risk for heart disease, type 2 diabetes, stroke and cancer.

Read more:

Do active teens enjoy a healthier, longer life?

Moderate exercise may be best

10 steps to sensible exercise

Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

 
NEXT ON HEALTH24X

More:

FitnessNews
advertisement

Read Health24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
0 comments
Comments have been closed for this article.

Live healthier

Hello? »

SEE: Interesting facts about hearing loss Earworms: Let it go Is it bad to sleep with earplugs all the time?

SEE: Do women hear better than men?

The reason why men often appear not to be listening could be because they actually can't hear you.

Confident smile? »

Acidic drinks can harm your kids' smiles The facts on bleaching your teeth Am I taking good care of my teeth?

Why are my teeth stained?

We know the rules – brush your teeth twice a day and floss to keep them healthy. But, have you ever wondered what causes those stains that sometimes appear?