advertisement
Question
Posted by: Kerry | 2010/06/14

Wrong career all my life?

Hi CS.

I have lost my job, becoz my boss says my personality is ‘ incompatible with the work’ . I am a very quiet person. I work as a writer in an ad agency  I attend client briefs with one of the head writers then when we get back to the office I write up the proposal. I am not loud and excitable, all the other writers are, but I have repeatedly been told my writing is excellent. In other words having not smoked a joint or had loud conversations all day long, I still produce competent work. But becoz I am so quiet, my boss says I have the wrong personality for job - yet she agrees I produce good work.

She however says the creative writing dept is not for withdrawn ppl and asks why I do not go for after-work drinks with the others, aren’ t participative in meetings (but I take copious notes and write up good proposals), don’ t have close buds at work and often take my lunch alone. I told her loud and brass is just not me but then she says I am like a grey cloud in an otherwise energetic environment. I don’ t see why I need to be as crazy as the others if my work is unaffected?

So I am a little confused at being told I live in a vacuum –  in fact my boss says I need therapy. And now ofcourse I wonder if I am in the wrong career. In every job I have always been told I am quiet, is this a wrong thing? What line of work shd I be in, if every creative writer/copywriter is supposed to be loud, dramatic and hard-living? I am very depressed about being laid off and I’ m confused about what job to look for. I’ ve heard this ‘ you’ re too quiet ‘ thing too often now  but what am I to do, when I specifically studied for this industry?

Who employs quiet people?

Thanks pls advise.

Not what you were looking for? Try searching again, or ask your own question
Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

I wonder what sort of job description they have for this job. If it's for a writer rather than a performer, surely its the quality of your writing that should count - and they can use other extrovert staff to make buzzing presentations when necessary.
Sounds like your boss, ( unreasonably to my mind ) prefers someone loud and very sociable - regardless of whether their actual writing work is good.
Personally, I'd greatly value a blessedly quiet collegue who was good at her actual work, in preference to a person who was the life and soul of every party, even if we weren't at a party, but whose work needed to be done or re-done by others.
Lets see what other readers might add, but I'd think you should be sought after by other less frothy and giggly agencies who value good work.
And if I were you, I'd speak to a good labour lawyer ( and the Dept of Labour, etc ) to check on whether these are legitimate grounds for making redundant someone who is actually good at the job at hand.
Maybe your sober quietness makes the noisy ones fel a bit guilty about all the time they waste ?

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

2
Our users say:
Posted by: Liza | 2010/06/14

If you enjoy your job, you''''re definitely not in the wrong career. Sounds to me like your ex-boss is the one with the problem - not you. It''s rather ridiculous to expect your employees to go for AFTER-work drinks. A boss cannot tell you what to do in your private life - that is illegal (and I agree with CS that you should go to the CCMA and sue your ex-boss''s butt so she can''t sit for the next year!) A good manager can manage employees with widely different personalities and abilities. Since your ex-boss can''t manage you by using your strengths, she''s obviously a terrible manager.

Personally I think it would be best for you to find another job in your chosen career where your strengths could be used to the advantage of your employer.

Something to think about in your chosen career however is that writers do NOT need to be dramatic, but they DO need to be dynamic! There is a vast difference between being loud-mouthed and being able to come up with creative and exciting new ideas. Being dynamic involves being excited about your own ideas so that your enthusiasm can infect others. Employers LOVE dynamic employees. Just inject some enthusiasm into your body language and tone of voice and the battle is mostly won.

Good Luck
Liza

Reply to Liza
Posted by: cybershrink | 2010/06/14

I wonder what sort of job description they have for this job. If it's for a writer rather than a performer, surely its the quality of your writing that should count - and they can use other extrovert staff to make buzzing presentations when necessary.
Sounds like your boss, ( unreasonably to my mind ) prefers someone loud and very sociable - regardless of whether their actual writing work is good.
Personally, I'd greatly value a blessedly quiet collegue who was good at her actual work, in preference to a person who was the life and soul of every party, even if we weren't at a party, but whose work needed to be done or re-done by others.
Lets see what other readers might add, but I'd think you should be sought after by other less frothy and giggly agencies who value good work.
And if I were you, I'd speak to a good labour lawyer ( and the Dept of Labour, etc ) to check on whether these are legitimate grounds for making redundant someone who is actually good at the job at hand.
Maybe your sober quietness makes the noisy ones fel a bit guilty about all the time they waste ?

Reply to cybershrink

Have your say

Thanks for commenting! Your comment will appear on the site shortly.
Thanks for commenting! Your comment will appear on the site shortly.
advertisement