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Question
Posted by: Keen | 2009-11-13

Worried about bipolar friend

Hi Doc

I have a friend of 25 years old that is still living with her parents. After her fathers death, she developed mental issues and eventually about 2 years ago she was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. She also cuts herself (but I see it hasn' t happened again for a few months now)

My concern is her medication. She is on 20mg of Cipralex, 300mg of Wellbutrin XR and 1mg of Xanor SR. She is also on birth control pills for female problems. The concern is that although she is on all this medication, I cannot see that she is improving. She is getting more depressed and doesn' t even go out of the house anymore. I go and visit her regularly and try and support her, but I' m very worried about her. I have mentioned to her to see a second doc for another opinion, but she refuses.

Her pdoc (I feel) is not addressing the root cause of her emotional issues and she is not in therapy at all.

What can I do to help her. She is a brilliant person, very intelligent and funny, and she really deserves a chance in life.

Thank you for your time and patience to read and answer this.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

Personally, I feel that treatment of such complex problems ENTIRELY with medication, is usually inadequate, and counselling at least should generally be aded to the mix. YOur problem is that if your friend is unwilling to seek a second opinion, there's not much you can do. Maybe you can encourage her to more clearly tell her current pdoc that she is not improving and =exactly how bad she is feeling, but beyond that, it's hard for you to intervene.
Otherwise, keep up your support, making it clear to her that you care about her and appreciate her, and want only the best for her.

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Our users say:
Posted by: cybershrink | 2009-11-13

Personally, I feel that treatment of such complex problems ENTIRELY with medication, is usually inadequate, and counselling at least should generally be aded to the mix. YOur problem is that if your friend is unwilling to seek a second opinion, there's not much you can do. Maybe you can encourage her to more clearly tell her current pdoc that she is not improving and =exactly how bad she is feeling, but beyond that, it's hard for you to intervene.
Otherwise, keep up your support, making it clear to her that you care about her and appreciate her, and want only the best for her.

Reply to cybershrink

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