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Question
Posted by: Zee | 2010/10/06

Work related

Hi all

Please advise. Note that I have posted on this issue before and its been like 3 months. Im trying to be patient but I really cant now. not that i have any other choice

when you have been identified as potential manager and are being trained by current manager to take over, in an ideal and fair world, how long should this " training"  take? 6 months? 9 months or even longer?

My boss was fired in February and they brought in a retired experienced guy to work with me from march. He has been “ training”  me and is happy with my work and has been telling me I will be the manager when he goes. His contract ends at the end of the year and nothing has been said about a replacement. The HR guy has hinted that they are considering making me a manager but this was just in an informal conversation. I do all the work, my “ manager”  only comes in for a few hours in a day just to see im on track. Im really tired and I feel this “ training”  process is taking forever and it is unfair. I feel the only reason they are throwing in the possibility of me getting this position in January is simply to make sure I don’ t ask for an increase or complain even though the scope of my work has drastically changed.

People say I must be patient and wait until January. Im saying I want an offer before we close in December. Is that unreasonable? Jobs are scarce but exploitation is not nice. Im always tired and im working really hard and it is just frustrating not to be rewarded for it.

As much as it is benefitting my career to be doing this work, im not happy with the arrangement. Please talk some sense into my head or are my concerns valid? I need a new perspective.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

Mmm. I suppose "training" can be used as an excuse to exploit someone already obviously capable of the job. Maybe they are stuck with your "manager" till the end of his contract, and don't want to promote you ( with a suitable pay rise ) until he leaves ?
Even if the promotion was to start in January, there's nothing to stop them from discussing it with you and making and announcing the decision before then.
Make sure that in the content and style of your reactions, you show yourself as managerial

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

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Our users say:
Posted by: Zee | 2010/10/06

I have been doing the same work , same profession for years at other employers. I have been doing this work here for 15 months and what im trying to say is that technically even when the old boss was here there was not much differences in what I do and what he was doing. Basically he’ d sit at meetings and report on what I do. So yes I have always been aware of the scope of his work. It’ s a small company and the department is small. I am already managing 2 people so managing is not a problem.

In terms of handling the stress and what would be required, I am already doing that, I sit in at high level meetings and liase with top management at all times.

I don’ t see it as a waste I really appreciate it but at the end of the day it would have been great to be compensated for being away from family while im working extra hours.

Thanks for your advice worker bee

Reply to Zee
Posted by: Worker | 2010/10/06

Hey,

Prior to the position that you are in - where you are being trained as a manager, how long were you in your position for? Exclude the work relating to the scope of being ''manager''. In that time, were you aware of your colleagues work descriptions or only your own?

Being a manager, does not mean that only a title gets changed. Your company must have faith in your ability to become manager. However, that still does not guarantee that you will be promoted.

Being manager is more than just extra pay and extra perks. It''s a whole different level, where the BUCK STOPS AT YOU. Ultimately, you are, when you become manager, responsible for your staff beneath you, your department etc.

Are you confident in your abilities that you will be able to handle this additional stress and requirements that will be required from you?

Rather than seeing this " training"  as being wasted, accept this gift with open arms and learn from this mentor that they have brought it. Your trainer has invaluable knowledge that you can use to perform better. Take this opportunity to learn and do as much as you can.

The more you prove yourself, the more your company will want you to be the MAN-ager

Hope this helps

Worker bee

Reply to Worker
Posted by: Danny | 2010/10/06

Dont rush be patient

Reply to Danny
Posted by: cybershrink | 2010/10/06

Mmm. I suppose "training" can be used as an excuse to exploit someone already obviously capable of the job. Maybe they are stuck with your "manager" till the end of his contract, and don't want to promote you ( with a suitable pay rise ) until he leaves ?
Even if the promotion was to start in January, there's nothing to stop them from discussing it with you and making and announcing the decision before then.
Make sure that in the content and style of your reactions, you show yourself as managerial

Reply to cybershrink

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