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Question
Posted by: Johann | 2012/10/29

Wife ill

My wife is constanly ill. She either is nauseaous, shaking, head ache, low blood pressure or low iron. She has been for several medical tests bur no one could find any problems... She complains non stop. It is impacting our marriage and our happiness as she never feels well enough to do anything. I ahve sympathy for an ill person but if no dr could fine anything worng, is she faking it? She is known for contantly being depressed and thinking negative about life, will this aggrevate the situation? What can I do?

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

"Low Blood Pressire" isn't a symptom or an illness, though some out-of-date doctors seem to think it might be. And "low iron" isn't a symptom either - nobody can tell whether their own iron level is low or high, and it does NOT need treatment. If genuine low BO is being caused by a medical condition ( very rare ) or as a side-effects of a medicine, then its these other things that need to be attended to.
Someone may feel weak, faint, whatever, and a blood test might find that there was a low iron level ( easily corrected by taking cheap iron tablets ).
But what you seem to be describing shounds like Hypochondriasis - someone who focusses excessively on their body and a host of awful IDEAS they have about what might be wrong with it, mistrusting their body and expecting it to cause trouble at any time. A psychiatrist should assess her ( taking along the reports of the doctors and tests which found nothing wrong ).
Depression, a common condition, can cause symptoms similar to those you describe, and can cause a degree of hypochondriasis.
You say she is constnatly depressed and thinking negatively.
Have her assessed by a good psychiatrist and discuss treatment options, which would at best include counselling of the CBT form from a psychologist, and maybe some carefulyl chosen antidepressant meds.
Be understanding and supportive. Being excessively caring can encourage some people to stick to their symptoms, as the only source of comfort they can find.

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2
Our users say:
Posted by: Leila | 2012/10/29

Have you tried finding out what is the cause of her depression? Definitely her being so negative will worsen any illness that she may have. I know, it must be hard on you.
The symptoms that you describe is most likely to be low blood pressure. Is she on medication for that?

It must be not easy on her either. Show her sympathy and more love and hopefully she will improve.

Reply to Leila
Posted by: cybershrink | 2012/10/29

"Low Blood Pressire" isn't a symptom or an illness, though some out-of-date doctors seem to think it might be. And "low iron" isn't a symptom either - nobody can tell whether their own iron level is low or high, and it does NOT need treatment. If genuine low BO is being caused by a medical condition ( very rare ) or as a side-effects of a medicine, then its these other things that need to be attended to.
Someone may feel weak, faint, whatever, and a blood test might find that there was a low iron level ( easily corrected by taking cheap iron tablets ).
But what you seem to be describing shounds like Hypochondriasis - someone who focusses excessively on their body and a host of awful IDEAS they have about what might be wrong with it, mistrusting their body and expecting it to cause trouble at any time. A psychiatrist should assess her ( taking along the reports of the doctors and tests which found nothing wrong ).
Depression, a common condition, can cause symptoms similar to those you describe, and can cause a degree of hypochondriasis.
You say she is constnatly depressed and thinking negatively.
Have her assessed by a good psychiatrist and discuss treatment options, which would at best include counselling of the CBT form from a psychologist, and maybe some carefulyl chosen antidepressant meds.
Be understanding and supportive. Being excessively caring can encourage some people to stick to their symptoms, as the only source of comfort they can find.

Reply to cybershrink

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