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Question
Posted by: Stew | 2010/01/18

Wheat Free Products

I am looking for wheat free products that one can buy in local supermarket.. Pasta' s etc.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageSports Nutrition

Dear Stew,

Gluten intolerance or sensitivity is a condition that occurs when the body cannot tolerate a particular protein called gluten, which is abundant in wheat, rye, oats and barley and their products. From a nutritional or dietary point of view, you should avoid foods containing wheat, rye, oats and barley and in addition, the restriction of fat and lactose may help to reduce occurrence of diarrhea.

Remember to always read the labels of all products – look at the ingredient list for products like wheat, rye, oats or barley

Other key words include: cereal, starch powder, flour, thickening agents, emulsifiers, gluten, stabilizers and hydrolyzed vegetable protein

Use Rice Crispies or Corn Flakes instead of bread crumbs

Use Rice noodles instead of Spaghetti

To thicken sauces, gravies and puddings use ½ tablespoon corn flour or 2 teaspoons quick cooking tapioca

When eating out, select plain foods, without crumbs, gravies, cream sauces


Replace flour in cooking. Wheat gluten is important in baking as it holds the dough together and allows the product to rise. Gluten-free products are crumbly and usually do not rise well.
1 cup wheat flour = 1 cup corn flour OR ¾ cup coarse maize meal [porridge] OR 1 cup fine maize meal [porridge] OR 5/8 cup potato flour OR 7/8 cup rice flour OR 5/8 cup rice flour + 1/3 cup potato flour OR 1 cup soy flour + ¾ cup potato flour

Gluten free flours should be baked more slowly at a slightly lower temperature than wheat flour. They do not brown well and tend to stick to baking tins [grease tins well or line with greased and floured wax paper]. Baking with gluten free flour requires more raising agent: use 2½ teaspoons baking powder per cup of gluten free flour. Not all baking powder is gluten free.

For more detailed info you should go to your nearest dietician, she can help you with brand names and specific items.

Kind regards,
Sunita

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

2
Our users say:
Posted by: Sue | 2010/03/05

HI. Some Spar stores stock buckwheat pasta which is gluten free and absolutely fantastic. Not sure where else to buy it. Otherwise Dischem has some great wheratfree products too. Egg noodles are also great.

Reply to Sue
Posted by: Sports Nutrition | 2010/01/22

Dear Stew,

Gluten intolerance or sensitivity is a condition that occurs when the body cannot tolerate a particular protein called gluten, which is abundant in wheat, rye, oats and barley and their products. From a nutritional or dietary point of view, you should avoid foods containing wheat, rye, oats and barley and in addition, the restriction of fat and lactose may help to reduce occurrence of diarrhea.

Remember to always read the labels of all products – look at the ingredient list for products like wheat, rye, oats or barley

Other key words include: cereal, starch powder, flour, thickening agents, emulsifiers, gluten, stabilizers and hydrolyzed vegetable protein

Use Rice Crispies or Corn Flakes instead of bread crumbs

Use Rice noodles instead of Spaghetti

To thicken sauces, gravies and puddings use ½ tablespoon corn flour or 2 teaspoons quick cooking tapioca

When eating out, select plain foods, without crumbs, gravies, cream sauces


Replace flour in cooking. Wheat gluten is important in baking as it holds the dough together and allows the product to rise. Gluten-free products are crumbly and usually do not rise well.
1 cup wheat flour = 1 cup corn flour OR ¾ cup coarse maize meal [porridge] OR 1 cup fine maize meal [porridge] OR 5/8 cup potato flour OR 7/8 cup rice flour OR 5/8 cup rice flour + 1/3 cup potato flour OR 1 cup soy flour + ¾ cup potato flour

Gluten free flours should be baked more slowly at a slightly lower temperature than wheat flour. They do not brown well and tend to stick to baking tins [grease tins well or line with greased and floured wax paper]. Baking with gluten free flour requires more raising agent: use 2½ teaspoons baking powder per cup of gluten free flour. Not all baking powder is gluten free.

For more detailed info you should go to your nearest dietician, she can help you with brand names and specific items.

Kind regards,
Sunita

Reply to Sports Nutrition

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