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Question
Posted by: Angelique | 2011/10/04

What shoes to buy

I have recently been amazed at how much thought goes into buying a good pair of exercise shoes. Please help!?

I do alot of brisk walking, and try to combine some jogging inbetween to get my heart rate up. I also do other exercises like strength training and cardio with a trainer who comes to our work place during the week. Although I am currently still jog / walking, I plan to try and build myself up and hopefully start running.

What shoes do I buy? I have a budget of about R1000.00 for shoes, and cannot buy seperate pairs for training AND for running AND for walking.
I also don''t understand what ''pronation'' means and if I should be bothered with that?

Please help

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageFitnessDoc

Hi Angelique

It can be very complex, but can I reassure you by saying that it's actually far simpler than people make it out to be! The key word is comfort. That's the first priority. If that shoe is not super comfortable in the shop, then it won't be after 45 minutes of pounding exercise. So it's the key point. All the other gadgets, and tricks and gimmicks are not really that effective, I have to be honest. So I would advise that you get a well cushioned shoe, a good one (but not necessarily top of the range), and then be assured that you'll get a good 6 to 9 months out of it (depending what you do, obviously!)

With your budget, a decent pair of running shoes is a good bet. That's the most 'specialised' type of shoe you'd need - you can use a running shoe for walking and gym training, whereas you couldn't really get away with it in the other direction. So I'd get a comfortable, well cushioned running shoe, which is possible for that price, and you'll be doing well!

Oh, and don't worry too much about pronation just yet - cross that bridge in 6 months if you need to. The latest science suggests that we kind of over-valued the idea and maybe made a bit of a big deal out of it when we needn't have!

Ross

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

3
Our users say:
Posted by: Dev | 2011/11/02

Hi Angelique.

Maybe look at getting a minimalistic pair, like the New Balance Minimis or the Merrell barefoot range. You might need to change your running style but in the long run you will reduce your risk of shin splints.

Reply to Dev
Posted by: fitnessdoc | 2011/10/13

Hi Angelique

It can be very complex, but can I reassure you by saying that it's actually far simpler than people make it out to be! The key word is comfort. That's the first priority. If that shoe is not super comfortable in the shop, then it won't be after 45 minutes of pounding exercise. So it's the key point. All the other gadgets, and tricks and gimmicks are not really that effective, I have to be honest. So I would advise that you get a well cushioned shoe, a good one (but not necessarily top of the range), and then be assured that you'll get a good 6 to 9 months out of it (depending what you do, obviously!)

With your budget, a decent pair of running shoes is a good bet. That's the most 'specialised' type of shoe you'd need - you can use a running shoe for walking and gym training, whereas you couldn't really get away with it in the other direction. So I'd get a comfortable, well cushioned running shoe, which is possible for that price, and you'll be doing well!

Oh, and don't worry too much about pronation just yet - cross that bridge in 6 months if you need to. The latest science suggests that we kind of over-valued the idea and maybe made a bit of a big deal out of it when we needn't have!

Ross

Reply to fitnessdoc
Posted by: Marathon runner | 2011/10/05

Angelique

There are three types of pronation:

1. Neutral pronation (normal arch)
There ia a distinct curve along the inside of your foot with a band a little less than half the widht of your foot connecting the heel and toe. Buy STABILITY running shoes.
This is my type of foot and I ran 5 Two Oceans 56km and 3 Comrades 89km.

2. Overpronator (low arch/ flat feet)
There is not much of a curve along the inside of your foot and your imprint show almost the entire foot . Foot ''rolls'' too far inward. Buy MOTION-CONTROL running shoes.

3. Underpronator (high arch)
There is a very sharp curve along the inside of your foor and your imprint shows a very thin band between your heel and toe. Typically do not pronate enough. . Buy CUSHIONED running shoes.

Hope this will clarify the word ''pronation''.
Best of luck...

Reply to Marathon runner

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