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Question
Posted by: Heyley | 2010/08/20

Weight Loss

Hi, i''ve heard that when exercising, you need to achieve a different heart rate during exercise for losing weight as opposed to someone who is doing general fitness training. I''m considered obese and don''t feel that my exercise routine achieves much.

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageFitnessDoc

Hi Heyley

No, not really, there's a lot of confusion about heart rate and "target zones" for different results. The reality is that time spent is by far the most important component of training. Whether you are training at 60% or 70% of your maximum heart rate is irrelevant provided you get 30 minutes of training in. If anything, it's better to be training harder, but there are practical problems with this that make it impossible to sustain (injury and overtraining among them).

So, the key is to accumulate the exercise time, not the intensity. The two obviously affect each other - the harder you train, the less time you can spend training, so there's this compromise at what you might call "moderate" intensity where you do 30 to 60 minutes of training.

Now, I'm not sure why your training is not achieving much. Are you trying to keep your heart rate down? Or high? Not clear on the specific reasons. But as I say, the intensity is less important than the time, and you should aim to train as hard as possible without overdoing it.

Good luck

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Our users say:
Posted by: fitnessdoc | 2010/08/27

Hi Heyley

No, not really, there's a lot of confusion about heart rate and "target zones" for different results. The reality is that time spent is by far the most important component of training. Whether you are training at 60% or 70% of your maximum heart rate is irrelevant provided you get 30 minutes of training in. If anything, it's better to be training harder, but there are practical problems with this that make it impossible to sustain (injury and overtraining among them).

So, the key is to accumulate the exercise time, not the intensity. The two obviously affect each other - the harder you train, the less time you can spend training, so there's this compromise at what you might call "moderate" intensity where you do 30 to 60 minutes of training.

Now, I'm not sure why your training is not achieving much. Are you trying to keep your heart rate down? Or high? Not clear on the specific reasons. But as I say, the intensity is less important than the time, and you should aim to train as hard as possible without overdoing it.

Good luck

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