advertisement
Question
Posted by: jenny | 2010-05-16

warts on horse

our 2 and a half year old stallion has warts on his " nose"  they look like human warts! i have googled and found out it''s a virus and will eventually go away by itself. is this true? if not what would you recommend?

Not what you were looking for? Try searching again, or ask your own question
Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberVet

Hi Jenny

It sounds like you stallion may have Verrucose warts - Papilloma viral warts.

Verrucose warts

Verrucose warts tend to affect juveniles. The virus is resistant in the environment and is readily transmissible to susceptible individuals by direct contact or by fomites.
Lesions are commonly seen on the lips, muzzle, nose and, occasionally, the limbs. The small grey-pink cauliflower-like growths can vary in number and size. Most lesions spontaneously regress after three to four months and are self-limiting.

Treatment may be warranted in some individuals where warts have become traumatised
or where there is a failure to acquire immunity. Surgical excision and/or cryosurgery are suitable techniques, but risks of depigmentation and scarring should be considered before embarking on the treatment of animals used for showing or which have sale potential.

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

1
Our users say:
Posted by: Cybervet | 2010-05-16

Hi Jenny

It sounds like you stallion may have Verrucose warts - Papilloma viral warts.

Verrucose warts

Verrucose warts tend to affect juveniles. The virus is resistant in the environment and is readily transmissible to susceptible individuals by direct contact or by fomites.
Lesions are commonly seen on the lips, muzzle, nose and, occasionally, the limbs. The small grey-pink cauliflower-like growths can vary in number and size. Most lesions spontaneously regress after three to four months and are self-limiting.

Treatment may be warranted in some individuals where warts have become traumatised
or where there is a failure to acquire immunity. Surgical excision and/or cryosurgery are suitable techniques, but risks of depigmentation and scarring should be considered before embarking on the treatment of animals used for showing or which have sale potential.

Reply to Cybervet

Have your say

Thanks for commenting! Your comment will appear on the site shortly.
Thanks for commenting! Your comment will appear on the site shortly.
advertisement