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Question
Posted by: Apple | 2010-07-28

vomiting

Hi, my dachhund of almost 5 months is vomiting almost every night. Sometimes like 3h00 in the morning. He eats a good quality dogfood and does not get extra food from us regularly. Maybe once or twice a month we might give him a small bone to chew on, but thats about it. What should I check for?

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Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberVet

Hi Apple It has been suggested that the vomiting that you are observing may be associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or another condition that causes a decrease in gastric motility. As a result this may lead to gastric reflux when the pup first gets up or when he gets excited. This diagnosis can be time consuming and expensive - ultrasound, biopsy's e.t.c. The most common treatments are histamine (H2) blockers like cimetidine, feeding small meals (feed a premium dog food) just before bed (even a novel protein diet)and using motility modifying medications like metoclopramide. These things sometimes work to control the problem and if no further signs develop it is reasonable to continue treatment prophylactically without a firm diagnosis, at least in my opinion. If the above fails then you may have to look at doing some diagnostics.

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

4
Our users say:
Posted by: Apple | 2010-08-06

He had worms... that must have been the problem.

Reply to Apple
Posted by: Apple | 2010-07-30

Thanks! Will experiment with that advice!

He is very healthy and playful otherwise... He eats 2 times per day (around 7h30 and 16h30). He does not get milk or other foods.

Reply to Apple
Posted by: Chill | 2010-07-28

Why don''t you do a little experimenting. First of all, give the pup his main meal at a different time of the day, and see if this has an effect. Second, and as a separate exercise, try slowing down the rate at which he eats - split up his main meal into two or three portions, and give them a few minutes apart.

If this makes a difference, then it''s possible he''s just being a greedy guts and eating more or faster than he should be. If it doesn''t help, then you''ll have more information to tell your vet, if you end up having to take him there.

In passing, you don''t mention whether the pup is otherwise healthy, and if he''s a good weight for his age. Nor do you say how many meals a day he''s getting - at his age, he should still be on two or three feeds a day - if you''re perhaps feeding him only once a day, this could also be your problem. He shouldn''t exercise too energetically within an hour or so after his dinner, either.

Lastly - some dogs don''t tolerate milk very well. If you''re incorporating milk into the pup''s food, try cutting this out, to check whether this might help.

Reply to Chill
Posted by: CyberVet | 2010-07-28

Hi Apple It has been suggested that the vomiting that you are observing may be associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or another condition that causes a decrease in gastric motility. As a result this may lead to gastric reflux when the pup first gets up or when he gets excited. This diagnosis can be time consuming and expensive - ultrasound, biopsy's e.t.c. The most common treatments are histamine (H2) blockers like cimetidine, feeding small meals (feed a premium dog food) just before bed (even a novel protein diet)and using motility modifying medications like metoclopramide. These things sometimes work to control the problem and if no further signs develop it is reasonable to continue treatment prophylactically without a firm diagnosis, at least in my opinion. If the above fails then you may have to look at doing some diagnostics.

Reply to CyberVet

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