advertisement
Question
Posted by: Thembi | 2010/06/11

Viva Bafana Bafana viva!!!

Get a life. This event is bigger than your pettiness whether you like it or not. This event is bigger than FIFA and its money mongers just like this country is bigger than its politics. Get off your moral high horses and go with the flow for a change - feel the excitement - see what it does for the concept of collective ubuntu. By all means, if you want to rant and rave, go for it. Meanwhile life goes on with or without you. Yes there are people dying of hunger all over the world - the soccer world cup never promised miracles - those people will still be there after. I work daily with a charity organisation in Gugs - those people that you refer to are ecstatic about their game being played in their country. They''''re not expecting anything out of it - they are content to involve themselves in temporary hype because it fills them with a sense of pride and purpose even if just for a moment. It lifts them above their circumstances and gives them precious memories. Those people that you are so worried about blow their vuvuzelas the loudest and yes probably at 5 in the morning because if they don''''t have the luxury of lying in in the mornings in warm beds. By no means could any World Cup equate to the Release of Mandela but if Madiba himself at the age of 90 + can muster the energy to give his stamp of approval, does this not tell you something?
If you are really worried about the hungry orphans that we work with, by all means boycott the world cup and come and give us a hand. So take your vuvuzelas out of your butts and if you cant beat them, for gods sake join them!! Viva Bafana Bafana Viva!!! Masibuye iAfrika.

Not what you were looking for? Try searching again, or ask your own question
Our expert says:
Expert ImageCyberShrink

That you ! May we all get a life.
You are totally enitled to get as excited over the SWC as you please. What you are NOT entitled to do is to insist that every other African living here must do exactly the same.
In our democracy, you are entitled to your opinion, and I am entitled to mine, and anon is entitled to anon's - and I in no way insist that you must feel about the SWC hype the way I do.
I have no doubt that the crowds who participate can share a most enjoyable igh and sense of well-bring. As this has cost us billions of rands, and the many clinics and schools not built so as to be able to afford this, it's an expensive high, like the use of some illicit drugs. If it gives us nothing else, and we return to our sour moods afterwards, without turning the delight you describe into actual concrete improvements in the life of all out people rather than only a privileged few, then it will have been a shameful waste. If we can collectively harness all the good feeling you describe into real achievements rather than PR puffery, I'll be delighted and among the first to praise this achievement.
I hadn't noticed myself ranting or raving ( I really don't have the energy for that ). And please don't make the mistake of assuming that anyone who disagrees with you, or with the expensive propaganda we have been fed, is somehow automatically ranting and raving.
Some of us, for instance, veterans of the Struggle, find it very distasteful when people declare that the opening of a soccer tournament is as important as when Madiba walked free. I don't know whether Madiba did, or is currently capable of, enthusiastically supporting the SWC - we have not heard from him directly, and what we do hear and see comes from spokespeople and PR folks.
You say the SWC never promised miracles, but so many immense benefits, not far short of miracles, have been declared by politicians and sponsors.
Have you even tried to calculate how many lasting warm beds, and warm meals could have been provided for the price of the costs of this world cup ? We chose ( or rather, those who chose for us did ) the games rather than the beds and meals.
YOu convincingly describe how some poor and deprived folks have learned to feel temporarily happy by blowing the horns and cheering the games. Sadly, that won't improve their situation much in the medium, let alone the long-term - imagine if, instead, they had been provided with needed services including learning how to directly act so as to improve their situation
I salute you for your work with people in need, and wish more folks would follow your example.
During the French Revolution, the soon-to-be executed Queen Marie Antionette was told that the people were rioting because they had no bread, and is said to have responded "Then, let them eat cake !" Apparently the modern version is : "Then let them blow vuvuselas. "

The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content.

4
Our users say:
Posted by: Thembi | 2010/06/12

I believe you have misunderstood me. I am quite content for you to have an opinion, in fact glad for it as I''m sure your opinion helps many in need. I said quote: " By all means rant and rave. Meanwhile life goes on with or without you."  What saddens me is that a website that offers psychiatric services is used as a tool to vent cynical frustrations about the World Cup. Believe me, I too have had my reservations and in fact wrote to the Cape Times in this connection - perhaps a more appropriate medium for expressing these concerns. But if World Cup woes qualify as psychiatric/psychological problems then by all means complain away. I in fact happened to be following up on a traumatic event in one of my family members lives when I came across all the criticisms from anon, me, etc. Doc, I don''t really understand Western (Euro-Americocentric) psychology and I don''t think Western psychology necessarily understands African subjects. When I speak of spirit, collective ubuntu, intuitive rationality, holistic ontology with the cosmos - most people look at me blankly. Rhythm and spirit is the architect of our being, it is the purest expression of life force in Africa. Talk is cheap - we don''t talk it out in psychotherapy. To us music and rhythm are more important ways of communication. Nobody seems to understand what it is that drives the exploited poverty stricken farmworker to sing and dance in the fields as they pick the grapes. Healing is grounded in the collective existence of the microcosm. To an extent I think that we have a lot to offer Western psychology - an understanding of the origin and essential nature of things, of the purposive character of the universe. All of this is expressed in the bigger picture of the World Cup. Maslow insisted that subsistent needs be met yet time and again exceptions to the strict hierarchy cast doubt on his theory. Was it Frankl who realised that even in man''s darkest moments meaning could be found - self transcendence? Like you, I hope and pray that some material good will arise from the World Cup but until then I will join my countryfellow and say - this picture is bigger than you or I - enjoy the rapture of the moment because now is all we have and tomorrow may not come at all. Rise up South Africa - rejoice in the spirit of humanity. Ke Nako!!!

Reply to Thembi
Posted by: anon | 2010/06/12

Thembi, you''re missing what i was saying and implying a lot about me as a person you know nothing about.

''If you are really worried about the hungry orphans that we work with, by all means boycott the world cup and come and give us a hand.'' & mdash  you have no idea what i do and don''t.

And I''m not in a warm bed at 5 in the morning. And i was talking about countries where there''s not even charity.

I don''t regard myself higher than anyone, i said that i was irritated. And it all stems from a place of true compassion for people in dire need.

I''m grateful for the work you do, and it would be lovely to accept that people don''t have to feel the same about something without being depreciative. In my post i was by no means trying to be personal.

let''s call it quits?

Reply to anon
Posted by: cybershrink | 2010/06/12

That you ! May we all get a life.
You are totally enitled to get as excited over the SWC as you please. What you are NOT entitled to do is to insist that every other African living here must do exactly the same.
In our democracy, you are entitled to your opinion, and I am entitled to mine, and anon is entitled to anon's - and I in no way insist that you must feel about the SWC hype the way I do.
I have no doubt that the crowds who participate can share a most enjoyable igh and sense of well-bring. As this has cost us billions of rands, and the many clinics and schools not built so as to be able to afford this, it's an expensive high, like the use of some illicit drugs. If it gives us nothing else, and we return to our sour moods afterwards, without turning the delight you describe into actual concrete improvements in the life of all out people rather than only a privileged few, then it will have been a shameful waste. If we can collectively harness all the good feeling you describe into real achievements rather than PR puffery, I'll be delighted and among the first to praise this achievement.
I hadn't noticed myself ranting or raving ( I really don't have the energy for that ). And please don't make the mistake of assuming that anyone who disagrees with you, or with the expensive propaganda we have been fed, is somehow automatically ranting and raving.
Some of us, for instance, veterans of the Struggle, find it very distasteful when people declare that the opening of a soccer tournament is as important as when Madiba walked free. I don't know whether Madiba did, or is currently capable of, enthusiastically supporting the SWC - we have not heard from him directly, and what we do hear and see comes from spokespeople and PR folks.
You say the SWC never promised miracles, but so many immense benefits, not far short of miracles, have been declared by politicians and sponsors.
Have you even tried to calculate how many lasting warm beds, and warm meals could have been provided for the price of the costs of this world cup ? We chose ( or rather, those who chose for us did ) the games rather than the beds and meals.
YOu convincingly describe how some poor and deprived folks have learned to feel temporarily happy by blowing the horns and cheering the games. Sadly, that won't improve their situation much in the medium, let alone the long-term - imagine if, instead, they had been provided with needed services including learning how to directly act so as to improve their situation
I salute you for your work with people in need, and wish more folks would follow your example.
During the French Revolution, the soon-to-be executed Queen Marie Antionette was told that the people were rioting because they had no bread, and is said to have responded "Then, let them eat cake !" Apparently the modern version is : "Then let them blow vuvuselas. "

Reply to cybershrink
Posted by: bru | 2010/06/11

Thembi Bafana''s first goal was AWESOME!!!! beautiful tightly tucked into the top right corner after ONE touch of the ball.....i was blown away!!!! Hope they get stronger and stronger!

Reply to bru

Have your say

Thanks for commenting! Your comment will appear on the site shortly.
Thanks for commenting! Your comment will appear on the site shortly.
advertisement